turn

  • 1 at every turn — {adv. phr.} Every time; all the time; continually without exception. * /Because of his drinking, the man was refused a job at every turn./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2 done to a turn — See: TO A T or TO A TURN …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3 in turn — {adv. phr.} According to a settled order; each following another. * /Each man in turn got up and spoke./ * /Two teachers supervised the lunch hour in turn./ * /Two of the three boys tease their younger brother John, the biggest, teases Bob, the… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 4 know which way to turn — See: NOT KNOW WHICH WAY TO TURN …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 5 not know which way to turn — or[not know which way to jump] {v. phr} To be puzzled about getting out of a difficulty; not know what to do to get out of trouble. * /When Jane missed the last bus home, she didn t know which way to turn./ * /After Mr. Brown died, Mrs. Brown had …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 6 out of turn — {adv. phr.} 1. Not in regular order; at the wrong time. * /John played out of turn./ * /By taking a day off out of turn, Bob got the schedule mixed up./ 2. Too hastily or wrongly; at the wrong time or place; so as to annoy others. * /Dick loses… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 7 speak out of turn — {v. phr.} To say something tactless; commit an indiscretion. * /You spoke out of turn in criticizing Aunt Hermione s old furniture; she considers herself quite a connoisseur on the subject./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 8 take a new turn — {v. phr.} To start a new course; decide upon a new direction. * /The company took a new turn under Jack s directorship./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 9 take a turn — {v. phr.} To become different; change. * /Mary s fever suddenly took a bad turn./ * /The story took an odd turn./ Often used with for the better or for the worse . * /In the afternoon the weather took a turn for the better./ * /Suddenly the… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 10 take a turn for the better — {v. phr.} To start improving; start to get better. * /Aunt Hermione was very ill for a long time, but last week she suddenly took a turn for the better./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 11 take a turn for the worse — See: FOR THE WORSE. Contrast: TAKE A TURN FOR THE BETTER …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 12 talk out of turn — See: SPEAK OUT OF TURN …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 13 tide turn — See: TURN THE TIDE …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14 turn — See: AT EVERY TURN, BLOOD RUN COLD or BLOOD TURNS TO ICE, BY TURNS, CALL THE TURN at CALL ONE S SHOTS(2), EVERY TIME ONE TURNS AROUND, IN TURN, NOT KNOW WHICH WAY TO TURN, OUT OF TURN, TAKE A TURN, TAKE TURNS, TO A T or TO A TURN …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15 turn a hand — {v. phr.} To do anything to help. Usually used in the negative. * /When we were all hurrying to get the house ready for company, Mary sat reading and wouldn t turn a hand./ Syn.: LIFT A FINGER …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 16 turn back the clock — See: PUT BACK THE CLOCK …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 17 turn color — {v. phr.} To become a different color. * /In the fall the leaves turn color./ * /When the dye was added the solution turned color./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 18 turn down — {v.} 1. To reduce the loudness, brightness, or force of. * /The theater lights were turned down./ * /Turn down that radio, will you?/ * /The hose was throwing too much water so I turned down the water a little bit./ 2. To refuse to accept; reject …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 19 turn in — {v.} 1. or[hand in] To give to someone; deliver to someone. * /I want you to turn in a good history paper./ * /When the football season was over, we turned in our uniforms./ 2. To inform on; report. * /She turned them in to the police for… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 20 turn in one's grave — or[turn over in one s grave] {v. phr.} To be so grieved or angry that you would not rest quietly in your grave. * /If your grandfather could see what you re doing now, he would turn over in his grave./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms


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