trifle

  • 1 Trifle — Trifle. Ilustraciones realizadas por Isabella Beeton en su libro Mrs Beeton s Book of House …

    Wikipedia Español

  • 2 Trifle — ist eine englische Süßspeise, bestehend aus mehreren Schichten aus Custard, Obst oder Marmelade, Biskuitkuchen und Schlagsahne. Der Biskuit wird im Allgemeinen mit Alkohol getränkt (Port, süßen Sherry, Madeira oder auch Weißwein). Das Wort Trifle …

    Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 3 Trifle — Autre nom Créole Lieu d origine Angleterre Place dans le service dessert Température de …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 4 Trifle — Tri fle, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Trifled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Trifling}.] [OE. trifelen, truflen. See {Trifle}, n.] To act or talk without seriousness, gravity, weight, or dignity; to act or talk with levity; to indulge in light or trivial amusements …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 trifle — trifle, toy, dally, flirt, coquet can all mean to deal with a person or thing without seriousness, earnestness, close attention, or purpose. Trifle, the most comprehensive term of the group, may be used interchangeably with any of the others,… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 6 trifle — [trī′fəl] n. [ME < OFr trufle, mockery, dim. of truffe, deception] 1. something of little value or importance; trivial thing, idea, etc.; paltry matter 2. a small amount of money 3. a small amount or degree; bit 4. esp. in England, a dessert… …

    English World dictionary

  • 7 Trifle — Tri fle, v. t. 1. To make of no importance; to treat as a trifle. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To spend in vanity; to fritter away; to waste; as, to trifle away money. We trifle time. Shak. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 Trifle — Tri fle, n. [OE. trifle, trufle, OF. trufle mockery, raillery, trifle, probably the same word as F. truffe truffle, the word being applied to any small or worthless object. See {Truffle}.] 1. A thing of very little value or importance; a paltry,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9 trifle — [n1] novelty item bagatelle, bauble, bibelot, curio, gewgaw*, knickknack, nothing*, novelty, objet d’art, plaything, toy, trinket, triviality, whatnot*; concept 446 trifle [n2] very small amout bit, dash, diddly*, drop, eyelash*, fly speck*,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 10 trifle — ► NOUN 1) a thing of little value or importance. 2) a small amount. 3) Brit. a cold dessert of sponge cake and fruit covered with layers of custard, jelly, and cream. ► VERB 1) (trifle with) treat without seriousness or respect. 2) archaic ta …

    English terms dictionary

  • 11 trifle — index palter, paucity, pettifog, scintilla, technicality Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 12 trifle — early 13c., trufle false or idle tale, later matter of little importance (late 13c.), from O.Fr. trufle mockery, dim. of truffe deception, of uncertain origin. The verb, in the sense of treat lightly, is first attested 1520s …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 13 trifle — (izg. tràjfl) m DEFINICIJA reg. 1. jelo od laganog tijesta i tučenih bjelanjaka koje se diže za vrijeme pečenja; nabujak 2. zast. komadić, mrvica ETIMOLOGIJA engl …

    Hrvatski jezični portal

  • 14 Trifle — For the type of metal, see Pewter. Trifle Trifle is a dessert dish made from thick (or often solidified) custard, fruit, sponge cake, fruit juice or gelatin, and whipped cream. These ingredients are usually arranged in layers with fruit and… …

    Wikipedia

  • 15 trifle — [[t]tra͟ɪf(ə)l[/t]] trifles, trifling, trifled 1) PHRASE: PHR adj/adv/prep (vagueness) You can use a trifle to mean slightly or to a small extent, especially in order make something you say seem less extreme. As a photographer, he d found both… …

    English dictionary

  • 16 trifle — I UK [ˈtraɪf(ə)l] / US noun Word forms trifle : singular trifle plural trifles 1) [countable/uncountable] a sweet food eaten especially in the UK, made from cake covered with fruit or jelly, cold custard, and sometimes cream 2) [countable] old… …

    English dictionary

  • 17 trifle — tri|fle1 [ˈtraıfəl] n [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: trufe, trufle deceiving, making fun ] 1.) a trifle formal slightly a trifle eccentric/odd/unexpected etc 2.) old fashioned something unimportant or not valuable ▪ …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 trifle — tri|fle1 [ traıfl ] noun 1. ) count OLD FASHIONED something that is not very important: a mere trifle 2. ) count or uncount a sweet food eaten especially in the U.K., made from cake covered with fruit or GELATIN, cold CUSTARD, and sometimes cream …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 19 trifle — I. noun Etymology: Middle English trufle, trifle, from Anglo French trufle, triffle fraud, trick, nonsense Date: 14th century 1. something of little value, substance, or importance 2. a dessert typically consisting of plain or sponge cake often… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 20 trifle — I n. a mere trifle II v. (d; intr.) to trifle with * * * [ traɪf(ə)l] (d; intr.) to trifle with a mere trifle …

    Combinatory dictionary


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