trick

  • 1 trick — See: DO THE TRICK, TURN THE TRICK …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2 trick or treat — {n.} The custom of going from house to house on Halloween asking for small gifts and playing tricks on people who refuse to give. * /When Mrs. Jones answered the doorbell, the children yelled Trick or treat. Mrs. Jones gave them all some candy./… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3 trick of the trade — {n. phr.}, {usually in plural}, {informal} 1. A piece of expert knowledge; a smart, quick, or skillful way of working at a trade or job. * /Mr. Olson spent years learning the tricks of the trade as a carpenter./ * /Any one can learn how to hang… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 4 trick of the trade — {n. phr.}, {usually in plural}, {informal} 1. A piece of expert knowledge; a smart, quick, or skillful way of working at a trade or job. * /Mr. Olson spent years learning the tricks of the trade as a carpenter./ * /Any one can learn how to hang… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 5 do the trick — {v. phr.}, {informal} To bring success in doing something; have a desired result. * /Jim was not passing in English, but he studied harder and that did the trick./ * /The car wheels slipped on the ice, so Tom put sand under them, which did the… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 6 do the trick — {v. phr.}, {informal} To bring success in doing something; have a desired result. * /Jim was not passing in English, but he studied harder and that did the trick./ * /The car wheels slipped on the ice, so Tom put sand under them, which did the… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 7 miss a trick — {v. phr.} To fail to see, hear, or notice something of even the slightest importance. * /He never misses a trick when it comes to the stock market./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 8 miss a trick — {v. phr.} To fail to see, hear, or notice something of even the slightest importance. * /He never misses a trick when it comes to the stock market./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 9 magic trick — n. An feat of illusion performed by an illusionist, which appears magical to naive observers. Syn: conjuring trick, trick, magic, legerdemain, illusion, deception. [WordNet 1.5] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 turn the trick — {v. phr.}, {informal} To bring about the result you want; succeed in what you plan to do. * /Jerry wanted to win both the swimming and diving contests, but he couldn t quite turn the trick./ Compare: DO THE TRICK …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 11 turn the trick — {v. phr.}, {informal} To bring about the result you want; succeed in what you plan to do. * /Jerry wanted to win both the swimming and diving contests, but he couldn t quite turn the trick./ Compare: DO THE TRICK …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 12 dirty trick — {n. phr.} A treacherous action; an unfair act. * /That was a dirty trick John played on Mary when he ran away with her younger sister./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 13 use every trick in the book — {v. phr.}, {informal} To avail oneself of any means at all in order to achieve one s goal, not exclusive of possibly immoral or illegal acts. * /Algernon used every trick in the book to get Maxine to go out with him, but she kept refusing./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14 use every trick in the book — {v. phr.}, {informal} To avail oneself of any means at all in order to achieve one s goal, not exclusive of possibly immoral or illegal acts. * /Algernon used every trick in the book to get Maxine to go out with him, but she kept refusing./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15 Dido — Di do, n.; pl. {Didos}. A shrewd trick; an antic; a caper. [1913 Webster] {To cut a dido}, to play a trick; to cut a caper; perhaps so called from the trick of Dido, who having bought so much land as a hide would cover, is said to have cut it… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 Didos — Dido Di do, n.; pl. {Didos}. A shrewd trick; an antic; a caper. [1913 Webster] {To cut a dido}, to play a trick; to cut a caper; perhaps so called from the trick of Dido, who having bought so much land as a hide would cover, is said to have cut… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17 Entrick — En*trick , v. t. [Cf. OE. entriken to perplex, OF. entriquer. Cf. {Trick}, {Intrigue}.] To trick, to perplex. [Obs.] Rom. of R. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 play tricks on — {v. phr.} To make another the victim of some trick or joke. * /Al got angry when his classmates played a trick on him by hiding his clothes while he was swimming./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 19 play tricks on — {v. phr.} To make another the victim of some trick or joke. * /Al got angry when his classmates played a trick on him by hiding his clothes while he was swimming./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 20 a — Monkey Mon key, n.; pl. {Monkeys}. [Cf. OIt. monicchio, It. monnino, dim. of monna an ape, also dame, mistress, contr. fr. madonna. See {Madonna}.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) (a) In the most general sense, any one of the Quadrumana, including apes, baboons,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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