throw+in

  • 1 Throw — Throw, v. t. [imp. {Threw} (thr[udd]); p. p. {Thrown} (thr[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Throwing}.] [OE. [thorn]rowen, [thorn]rawen, to throw, to twist, AS. [thorn]r[=a]wan to twist, to whirl; akin to D. draaijen, G. drehen, OHG. dr[=a]jan, L. terebra …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 throw — [θrəʊ ǁ θroʊ] verb threw PASTTENSE [θruː] thrown PASTPART [θrəʊn ǁ θroʊn] [transitive] 1. throw money at to try to solve a problem by spending a lot of money, without really thinking about the problem: • There is no point throwing money at the… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 3 throw — [thrō] vt. threw, thrown, throwing [ME throwen, to twist, wring, hurl < OE thrawan, to throw, twist, akin to Ger drehen, to twist, turn < IE base * ter , to rub, rub with turning motion, bore > THRASH, THREAD, Gr teirein, L terere, to… …

    English World dictionary

  • 4 throw — ► VERB (past threw; past part. thrown) 1) propel with force through the air by a rapid movement of the arm and hand. 2) move or put into place quickly, hurriedly, or roughly. 3) project, direct, or cast (light, an expression, etc.) in a… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 5 throw on — To put on hastily • • • Main Entry: ↑throw * * * ˌthrow ˈon [transitive] [present tense I/you/we/they throw on he/she/it throws on …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 6 Throw — Throw, n. 1. The act of hurling or flinging; a driving or propelling from the hand or an engine; a cast. [1913 Webster] He heaved a stone, and, rising to the throw, He sent it in a whirlwind at the foe. Addison. [1913 Webster] 2. A stroke; a blow …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 throw — throw, cast, fling, hurl, pitch, toss, sling can all mean to cause to move swiftly forward, sideways, upward, or downward by a propulsive movement (as of the arm) or by means of a propelling instrument or agency. Throw, the general word, is often …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 8 throw — throw; over·throw·al; throw·er; throw·ster; ca ·throw; …

    English syllables

  • 9 throw up — {v.} 1. {informal} or {slang}[heave up]. To vomit. * /The heat made him feel sick and he thought he would throw up./ * /He took the medicine but threw it up a minute later./ 2. {informal} To quit; leave; let go; give up. * /When she broke their… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 10 throw up — {v.} 1. {informal} or {slang}[heave up]. To vomit. * /The heat made him feel sick and he thought he would throw up./ * /He took the medicine but threw it up a minute later./ 2. {informal} To quit; leave; let go; give up. * /When she broke their… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 11 Throw — Throw, v. i. To perform the act of throwing or casting; to cast; specifically, to cast dice. [1913 Webster] {To throw about}, to cast about; to try expedients. [R.] [1913 Webster] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12 Throw — Throw, n. [AS. [thorn]r[=a]h, [thorn]r[=a]g.] Time; while; space of time; moment; trice. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] I will with Thomas speak a little throw. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13 throw — [v1] propel something through the air bandy, barrage, bombard, buck, bunt, butt, cant, cast, catapult, chuck, dash, deliver, discharge, dislodge, drive, fell, fire, flick, fling, fling off, flip, floor, force, heave, hurl, impel, lapidate, launch …

    New thesaurus

  • 14 throw up — [v1] vomit, be nauseous be sick, bring up, disgorge, heave, puke*, regurgitate, retch, spew, spit up, upchuck*; concepts 179,308 throw up [v2] build quickly build overnight*, jerrybuild*, knock together*, patch, put together, roughcast, roughhew …

    New thesaurus

  • 15 Throw — (thr[=o]), n. [See {Throe}.] Pain; especially, pain of travail; throe. [Obs.] Spenser. Dryden. [1913 Webster] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 throw-in — n an action in which someone throws the ball back onto the field in a game of football ▪ Beckham will take the throw in …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 throw-in — throw ins N COUNT When there is a throw in in a football or rugby match, the ball is thrown back onto the field after it has been kicked off it …

    English dictionary

  • 18 throw in — (something) to include something extra. If you subscribe now, the phone company throws in 90 days of free Internet access. She would throw some French fries in to keep the customers happy …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 19 throw on — (something) to quickly put on something. He leapt out of bed and threw his clothes on. She threw on a raincoat and ran outdoors to get the cat. Opposite of: throw off (something) …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 20 throw up — (something) to vomit. The bus ride was making him feel sick, and he was afraid he was going to throw up. I fed the baby some fruit, but she threw it up …

    New idioms dictionary


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