slander

  • 1 slander — slan·der 1 / slan dər/ vt: to utter slander against slan·der·er n slander 2 n [Anglo French esclandre, from Old French escandle esclandre scandal, from Late Latin scandalum moral stumbling block, disgrace, from Greek skandalon, literally, snare,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 Slander — • The attributing to another of a fault of which one knows him to be innocent Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Slander     Slander      …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 3 Slander — Slan der, n. [OE. sclandere, OF. esclandre, esclandle, escandre, F. esclandre, fr. L. scandalum, Gr. ??? a snare, stumbling block, offense, scandal; probably originally, the spring of a trap, and akin to Skr. skand to spring, leap. See {Scan},… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 Slander — Slan der, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Slandered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Slandering}.] 1. To defame; to injure by maliciously uttering a false report; to tarnish or impair the reputation of by false tales maliciously told or propagated; to calumniate. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 slander — n calumny, *detraction, backbiting, scandal Analogous words: defamation, vilification, aspersion, traducing (see corresponding verbs at MALIGN): *abuse, vituperation, invective, obloquy, scurrility slander vb defame, libel, calumniate, *malign,… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 6 slander — [n] scandalous remark aspersion, backbiting*, backstabbing*, belittlement, black eye*, calumny, defamation, depreciation, detraction, dirt*, dirty linen*, disparagement, hit*, libel, lie, misrepresentation, muckraking, mud*, mud slinging*,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 slander — [slan′dər] n. [ME sclaunder < Anglo Fr esclaundre (OFr esclandre, escandle) < LL(Ec) scandalum: see SCANDAL] 1. the utterance in the presence of another person of a false statement or statements, damaging to a third person s character or… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 slander — ► NOUN Law 1) the action or crime of making a false spoken statement damaging to a person s reputation. Compare with LIBEL(Cf. ↑libelous). 2) a false and malicious spoken statement. ► VERB ▪ make such statements about. DERIVATIVES slanderer …

    English terms dictionary

  • 9 SLANDER — The only instance of defamation in biblical law for which a penalty is prescribed is that of the virgin (Deut. 22:19) – and that defamation is in the nature of a matrimonial stratagem (cf. Deut. 22:16–17) rather than of a specifically defamatory… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 10 slander — ▪ I. slander slan‧der 1 [ˈslɑːndə ǁ ˈslændər] noun [countable, uncountable] LAW a spoken statement about someone that is not true and is intended to damage the good opinion that people have of him or her, or the legal offence of making a… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 11 slander — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ gross (BrE), malicious, vicious, vile VERB + SLANDER ▪ be guilty of ▪ sue sb for …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 12 slander — The speaking of base and defamatory words tending to prejudice another in his reputation, community standing, office, trade, business, or means of livelihood. Little Stores v. Isenberg, 26 Tenn.App. 357, 172 S.W.2d 13, 16. Oral defamation; the… …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 13 slander — I UK [ˈslɑːndə(r)] / US [ˈslændər] noun Word forms slander : singular slander plural slanders 1) [uncountable] legal the crime of saying something about someone that is not true and is likely to damage their reputation 2) [countable/uncountable]… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 slander — slanderer, n. slanderingly, adv. slanderous, adj. slanderously, adv. slanderousness, n. /slan deuhr/, n. 1. defamation; calumny: rumors full of slander. 2. a malicious, false, and defamatory statement or report: a slander against his good name …

    Universalium

  • 15 slander — {{11}}slander (n.) late 13c., from Anglo Fr. esclaundre, O.Fr. esclandre scandalous statement, alteration of escandle scandal, from L. scandalum cause of offense, stumbling block, temptation (see SCANDAL (Cf. scandal)). {{12}}slander (v.) c.1300 …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 16 slander — [[t]slɑ͟ːndə(r), slæ̱n [/t]] slanders, slandering, slandered 1) N VAR Slander is an untrue spoken statement about someone which is intended to damage their reputation. Compare libel. Dr. Bach is now suing the company for slander... Korea has been …

    English dictionary

  • 17 slander — n. to spread slander * * * [ slɑːndə] to spread slander …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 18 slander — slan|der1 [ˈsla:ndə US ˈslændər] n [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: esclandre, from Late Latin scandalum; SCANDAL] 1.) [U and C] a false spoken statement about someone, intended to damage the good opinion that people have of that person… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19 slander — slan|der1 [ slændər ] noun 1. ) count or uncount something bad that you say about someone that is not true and may damage their reputation: What you said about Barbara is cruel and vicious slander. 2. ) uncount LEGAL the crime of saying something …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 20 slander — [13] Slander and scandal are ultimately the same word. Both go back to Latin scandalum ‘cause of offence’. This passed into Old French as escandle, which in due course had its consonants switched round to produce esclandre, source of English… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins


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