profess

  • 1 Profess — Pro*fess , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Professed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Professing}.] [F. prof[ e]s, masc., professe, fem., professed (monk or nun), L. professus, p. p. of profiteri to profess; pro before, forward + fateri to confess, own. See {Confess}.]… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 profess — [prō fes′, prəfes′] vt. [< L professus, pp. of profiteri, to avow publicly < pro , before (see PRO 2) + fateri, to avow, akin to fari, to speak: see FABLE] 1. to make an open declaration of; affirm [to profess one s love] 2. to claim to… …

    English World dictionary

  • 3 Profess — Pro*fess (pr[ o]*f[e^]s ), v. i. 1. To take a profession upon one s self by a public declaration; to confess. Drayton. [1913 Webster] 2. To declare friendship. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 Profess — Profess, das Ordensgelübde, welches in einem Kloster nach überstandenem Noviciat abgelegt wird. –s …

    Damen Conversations Lexikon

  • 5 profess — I (avow) verb acknowledge, admit, advocate, affirm, announce, assert, asseverate, assure, attest, aver, avouch, contend, declare, disclose, divulge, hold out, lay bare, lay open, maintain, make a statement, make an assertion, make clear, make… …

    Law dictionary

  • 6 profess — (v.) early 14c., to take a vow (in a religious order), from O.Fr. profes, from L. professus having declared publicly, pp. of profitieri declare openly, from pro forth (see PRO (Cf. pro )) + fateri (pp. fassus) acknowledge, confess, akin to fari …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 7 profess — *assert, declare, affirm, aver, protest, avouch, avow, predicate, warrant Analogous words: allege, *adduce, advance …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 8 profess — [v] declare, assert acknowledge, act as if, admit, affirm, allege, announce, asseverate, aver, avouch, avow, blow hot air*, certify, claim, come out*, confess, confirm, constate, croon, cross heart*, depose, dissemble, fake, feign, get off chest* …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 profess — ► VERB 1) claim that one has (a quality or feeling). 2) affirm one s faith in or allegiance to (a religion). ORIGIN Latin profiteri declare publicly …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 Profess — Ein Ordensgelübde (Profess von lat. professio = Bekenntnis) ist das öffentliche Versprechen eines Anwärters (Novizen) in einer christlichen Ordensgemeinschaft, nach den Grundprinzipien des Evangeliums und unter einem Oberen nach einer Ordensregel …

    Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 11 profess — pro|fess [prəˈfes] v [T] formal [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: professus, past participle of profiteri to profess, confess ] 1.) to say that you do, are etc something, especially when it is not really true profess to do/be sth ▪ The… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 profess — [[t]prəfe̱s[/t]] professes, professing, professed 1) VERB If you profess to do or have something, you claim that you do it or have it, often when you do not. [FORMAL] [V to inf] She professed to hate her nickname... [V that] Why do organisations… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 profess — UK [prəˈfes] / US verb [transitive] Word forms profess : present tense I/you/we/they profess he/she/it professes present participle professing past tense professed past participle professed formal 1) to claim something, especially when it is not… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 Profess — Pro|fẹss I 〈f.; , se〉 Ablegung der Ordensgelübde II 〈m.; en, en〉 Klostermitglied, das die Ordensgelübde abgelegt hat [zu I: <lat. professio „Bekenntnis“; zu profiteri „öffentlich bekennen“; zu II: <lat. professus „einer, der ein öffentl.… …

    Universal-Lexikon

  • 15 profess — verb (T) formal 1 (T) to make a claim about something, especially a false one: profess to do sth: Leon professes to love his son, but he shows precious little evidence of it. | profess to be sth: Tusker professed to be an expert on Islamic art. 2 …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16 profess — verb Etymology: in sense 1, from Middle English, from profes, adjective, having professed one s vows, from Anglo French, from Late Latin professus, from Latin, past participle of profitēri to profess, confess, from pro before + fatēri to… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17 Profess — 1Pro|fess der; en, en <aus mlat. professus, Part. Perf. von profiteri »sich auf die Klostergelübde verpflichten« zu lat. profiteri, vgl. ↑Profession> jmd., der die 2Profess ablegt u. Mitglied eines geistlichen Ordens od. einer ↑Kongregation …

    Das große Fremdwörterbuch

  • 18 profess — pro|fess [ prə fes ] verb transitive FORMAL 1. ) to claim something, especially when it is not true: Many wildlife smugglers profess to have an interest in conservation. 2. ) to admit publicly that you have a particular feeling or belief: He… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 19 profess — [14] Profess comes from prōfessus, the past participle of Latin prōfitērī ‘declare publicly’. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix prō ‘forth, in public’ and fatērī ‘acknowledge, confess’ (a relative of English fable, fame, and fate… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 20 profess — [14] Profess comes from prōfessus, the past participle of Latin prōfitērī ‘declare publicly’. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix prō ‘forth, in public’ and fatērī ‘acknowledge, confess’ (a relative of English fable, fame, and fate… …

    Word origins


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