not+fictitious

  • 1 not fictitious — index actual, authentic, documentary, true (authentic) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 Fictitious entry — Fictitious entries, also known as fake entries, Mountweazels, ghost word[1] and nihil articles, are deliberately incorrect entries or articles in reference works such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, maps, and directories. Entries in reference… …

    Wikipedia

  • 3 Fictitious capital — is a concept used by Karl Marx in his critique of political economy. It is introduced in the third volume of Capital. [cite book last = Marx first = Karl author link = Karl Marx title = Capital, volume III url =… …

    Wikipedia

  • 4 fictitious defendants — When a party suing (plaintiff) is not sure whether there are unknown persons involved in the suit, they are given fictitious names, usually designated Doe I, Doe II, and so forth, with an allegation in the complaint that if and when the true… …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 fictitious — fictitious, fabulous, legendary, mythical, apocryphal mean having the character of something invented or imagined as opposed to something true or genuine. Fictitious commonly implies fabrication and, therefore, more often suggests artificiality… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 6 fictitious — [fik tish′əs] adj. [L ficticius < pp. of fingere, to form, devise: see DOUGH] 1. of or like fiction; imaginary 2. not real; pretended; false [fictitious joy] 3. assumed for disguise or deception [a fictitious name] fictitiously adv. SYN …

    English World dictionary

  • 7 Fictitious defendants — are real persons a plaintiff believes it has a cause of action against in a lawsuit who, for one reason or another, cannot be identified by the plaintiff before a lawsuit is commenced. As the statute of limitations for many torts such as medical… …

    Wikipedia

  • 8 Fictitious — Fic*ti tious, a. [L. fictitius. See {Fiction}.] Feigned; imaginary; not real; fabulous; counterfeit; false; not genuine; as, fictitious fame. [1913 Webster] The human persons are as fictitious as the airy ones. Pope. {Fic*ti tious*ly}, adv.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9 fictitious precision — ficˌtitious preˈcision noun [uncountable] ACCOUNTING when a set of figures look correct because of their detail and their appearance but are in fact not correct: • Fictitious precision is just one of many ways in which managers can be misled by… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 10 fictitious payee — n: a person named as payee in an instrument who does not in fact exist or who does exist but to whom the maker of the instrument does not intend to convey any interest in the instrument Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …

    Law dictionary

  • 11 fictitious — UK US /fɪkˈtɪʃəs/ adjective ► not real: »Executives invented fictitious sales to justify amounts transferred offshore. »Many of the internet customers had been giving fictitious names and addresses …

    Financial and business terms

  • 12 Not Brand Echh — #2 (Sept. 1967). Cover art by Marie Severin, featuring parodies of Marvel characters as well as those of DC, Gold Key, and Tower Comics. Publication information …

    Wikipedia

  • 13 fictitious — ► ADJECTIVE 1) not real or true, being imaginary or invented. 2) referring to the characters and events found in fiction. DERIVATIVES fictitiously adverb fictitiousness noun …

    English terms dictionary

  • 14 Fictitious force — Classical mechanics Newton s Second Law History of classical mechanics  …

    Wikipedia

  • 15 Fictitious play — In game theory, fictitious play is a learning rule first introduced by G.W. Brown (1951). In it, each player presumes that her/his opponents are playing stationary (possibly mixed) strategies. At each round, each player thus best responds to the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 16 Fictitious domain name — A fictitious domain name is a domain name used in a work of fiction or popular culture to refer to an Internet address that does not actually exist. This is similar in concept to 555 telephone numbers. RFC 2606 specifies particular reserved… …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 fictitious — adjective Etymology: Latin ficticius artificial, feigned, from fictus Date: circa 1633 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of fiction ; imaginary 2. a. conventionally or hypothetically assumed or accepted < a fictitious concept > b. of a name …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18 fictitious — [[t]fɪktɪ̱ʃəs[/t]] 1) ADJ: usu ADJ n Fictitious is used to describe something that is false or does not exist, although some people claim that it is true or exists. We re interested in the source of these fictitious rumours. Syn: non existent 2)… …

    English dictionary

  • 19 fictitious — fictional, fictitious Fictional means ‘occurring in fiction’, i.e. in a piece of literature, whereas fictitious means ‘invented, unreal; not genuine’. So Oliver Twist is a fictional name when it refers to Dickens s character, and a fictitious… …

    Modern English usage

  • 20 fictitious — fic|ti|tious [fıkˈtıʃəs] adj [Date: 1600 1700; : Latin; Origin: ficticius artificial , from fictus; FICTION] not true, or not real ▪ a fictitious address ▪ The author fills this real town with fictitious characters …

    Dictionary of contemporary English


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