mass

  • 1 Blue mass — Mass Mass, n. [OE. masse, F. masse, L. massa; akin to Gr. ? a barley cake, fr. ? to knead. Cf. {Macerate}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A quantity of matter cohering together so as to make one body, or an aggregation of particles or things which… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Blue mass — Blue Blue (bl[=u]), a. [Compar. {Bluer} (bl[=u] [ e]r); superl. {Bluest}.] [OE. bla, blo, blew, blue, livid, black, fr. Icel.bl[=a]r livid; akin to Dan. blaa blue, Sw. bl[*a], D. blauw, OHG. bl[=a]o, G. blau; but influenced in form by F. bleu,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 canon of the Mass — Ordinary Or di*na*ry, n.; pl. {Ordinaries} ( r[i^]z). 1. (Law) (a) (Roman Law) An officer who has original jurisdiction in his own right, and not by deputation. (b) (Eng. Law) One who has immediate jurisdiction in matters ecclesiastical; an… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 Canon of the Mass — Mass Mass (m[.a]s), n. [OE. masse, messe, AS. m[ae]sse. LL. missa, from L. mittere, missum, to send, dismiss: cf. F. messe. In the ancient churches, the public services at which the catechumens were permitted to be present were called missa… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 Canon of the Mass — canon can on (k[a^]n [u^]n), n. [OE. canon, canoun, AS. canon rule (cf. F. canon, LL. canon, and, for sense 7, F. chanoine, LL. canonicus), fr. L. canon a measuring line, rule, model, fr. Gr. kanw n rule, rod, fr. ka nh, ka nnh, reed. See {Cane} …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 Ground mass — ground ground (ground), n. [OE. ground, grund, AS. grund; akin to D. grond, OS., G., Sw., & Dan. grund, Icel. grunnr bottom, Goth. grundus (in composition); perh. orig. meaning, dust, gravel, and if so perh. akin to E. grind.] 1. The surface of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 High Mass — Mass Mass (m[.a]s), n. [OE. masse, messe, AS. m[ae]sse. LL. missa, from L. mittere, missum, to send, dismiss: cf. F. messe. In the ancient churches, the public services at which the catechumens were permitted to be present were called missa… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 High Mass — High High, a. [Compar. {Higher}; superl. {Highest}.] [OE. high, hegh, hey, heh, AS. he[ a]h, h?h; akin to OS. h?h, OFries. hag, hach, D. hoog, OHG. h?h, G. hoch, Icel. h?r, Sw. h[ o]g, Dan. h[ o]i, Goth. hauhs, and to Icel. haugr mound, G. h[… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9 high-resolution mass spectrometer — mass spectrometer mass spectrometer n. (Physics, Chemistry) An analytical instrument which determines the mass of molecules of a substance or fragments of its molecules. It functions by injecting ionized moecules or molecular gragments into a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 Lady Mass — Lady La dy (l[=a] d[y^]), n.; pl. {Ladies} (l[=a] d[i^]z). [OE. ladi, l[ae]fdi, AS. hl[=ae]fdige, hl[=ae]fdie; AS. hl[=a]f loaf + a root of uncertain origin, possibly akin to E. dairy. See {Loaf}, and cf. {Lord}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A woman who… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11 Levy in mass — Levy Lev y, n. [F. lev[ e]e, fr. lever to raise. See {Lever}, and cf. {Levee}.] 1. The act of levying or collecting by authority; as, the levy of troops, taxes, etc. [1913 Webster] A levy of all the men left under sixty. Thirlwall. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12 Low Mass — Mass Mass (m[.a]s), n. [OE. masse, messe, AS. m[ae]sse. LL. missa, from L. mittere, missum, to send, dismiss: cf. F. messe. In the ancient churches, the public services at which the catechumens were permitted to be present were called missa… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13 Mass — Mass, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Massed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Massing}.] To celebrate Mass. [Obs.] Hooker. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14 Mass — Mass, n. [OE. masse, F. masse, L. massa; akin to Gr. ? a barley cake, fr. ? to knead. Cf. {Macerate}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A quantity of matter cohering together so as to make one body, or an aggregation of particles or things which collectively… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15 Mass — (m[.a]s), n. [OE. masse, messe, AS. m[ae]sse. LL. missa, from L. mittere, missum, to send, dismiss: cf. F. messe. In the ancient churches, the public services at which the catechumens were permitted to be present were called missa catechumenorum …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 Mass — Mass, v. t. To form or collect into a mass; to form into a collective body; to bring together into masses; to assemble. [1913 Webster] But mass them together and they are terrible indeed. Coleridge. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17 Mass bell — Sanctus Sanc tus, n. [L. sanctus, p. p. of sancire.] 1. (Eccl.) A part of the Mass, or, in Protestant churches, a part of the communion service, of which the first words in Latin are Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus [Holy, holy, holy]; called also… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 Mass bell — Mass Mass (m[.a]s), n. [OE. masse, messe, AS. m[ae]sse. LL. missa, from L. mittere, missum, to send, dismiss: cf. F. messe. In the ancient churches, the public services at which the catechumens were permitted to be present were called missa… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19 Mass book — Mass Mass (m[.a]s), n. [OE. masse, messe, AS. m[ae]sse. LL. missa, from L. mittere, missum, to send, dismiss: cf. F. messe. In the ancient churches, the public services at which the catechumens were permitted to be present were called missa… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20 Mass center — Mass Mass, n. [OE. masse, F. masse, L. massa; akin to Gr. ? a barley cake, fr. ? to knead. Cf. {Macerate}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A quantity of matter cohering together so as to make one body, or an aggregation of particles or things which… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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