inordinate+desire

  • 1 inordinate desire — index greed Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 inordinate desire to gain — index greed Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 Ambition — Am*bi tion, n. [F. ambition, L. ambitio a going around, especially of candidates for office is Rome, to solicit votes (hence, desire for office or honor), fr. ambire to go around. See {Ambient}, {Issue}.] 1. The act of going about to solicit or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 Avarice — Av a*rice ([a^]v [.a]*r[i^]s), n. [F. avaritia, fr. avarus avaricious, prob. fr. av[=e]re to covet, fr. a root av to satiate one s self: cf. Gr. a menai, a^sai, to satiate, Skr. av to satiate one s self, rejoice, protect.] 1. An excessive or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 Covet — Cov et, v. i. To have or indulge inordinate desire. [1913 Webster] Which [money] while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith. 1 Tim. vi. 10. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 Covetousness — Cov et*ous*ness, n. 1. Strong desire. [R.] [1913 Webster] When workmen strive to do better than well, They do confound their skill in covetousness. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. A strong or inordinate desire of obtaining and possessing some supposed… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 Cupidity — Cu*pid i*ty (k? p?d ? t?), n. [F. cupidite, L. cupiditas, fr. cupidus longing, desiring, fr. cupere to long for, desire. See {Covet}.] 1. A passionate desire; love. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. Eager or inordinate desire, especially for wealth; greed …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 Passion — Pas sion, n. [F., fr. L. passio, fr. pati, passus, to suffer. See {Patient}.] 1. A suffering or enduring of imposed or inflicted pain; any suffering or distress (as, a cardiac passion); specifically, the suffering of Christ between the time of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9 Passion flower — Passion Pas sion, n. [F., fr. L. passio, fr. pati, passus, to suffer. See {Patient}.] 1. A suffering or enduring of imposed or inflicted pain; any suffering or distress (as, a cardiac passion); specifically, the suffering of Christ between the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 Passion music — Passion Pas sion, n. [F., fr. L. passio, fr. pati, passus, to suffer. See {Patient}.] 1. A suffering or enduring of imposed or inflicted pain; any suffering or distress (as, a cardiac passion); specifically, the suffering of Christ between the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11 Passion play — Passion Pas sion, n. [F., fr. L. passio, fr. pati, passus, to suffer. See {Patient}.] 1. A suffering or enduring of imposed or inflicted pain; any suffering or distress (as, a cardiac passion); specifically, the suffering of Christ between the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12 Passion Sunday — Passion Pas sion, n. [F., fr. L. passio, fr. pati, passus, to suffer. See {Patient}.] 1. A suffering or enduring of imposed or inflicted pain; any suffering or distress (as, a cardiac passion); specifically, the suffering of Christ between the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13 Passion Week — Passion Pas sion, n. [F., fr. L. passio, fr. pati, passus, to suffer. See {Patient}.] 1. A suffering or enduring of imposed or inflicted pain; any suffering or distress (as, a cardiac passion); specifically, the suffering of Christ between the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14 covet — verb Etymology: Middle English coveiten, from Anglo French coveiter, from Vulgar Latin *cupidietare, from Latin cupiditat , cupiditas desire, from cupidus desirous, from cupere to desire Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to wish for earnestly …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 15 covetous — adjective Date: 13th century 1. marked by inordinate desire for wealth or possessions or for another s possessions 2. having a craving for possession < covetous of power > • covetously adverb • covetousness noun Synonyms …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16 cupidity — noun (plural ties) Etymology: Middle English cupidite, from Anglo French cupidité, from Latin cupiditat , cupiditas more at covet Date: 15th century 1. inordinate desire for wealth ; avarice, greed 2. strong desire …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17 ambition — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin ambition , ambitio, literally, act of soliciting for votes, from ambire Date: 14th century 1. a. an ardent desire for rank, fame, or power b. desire to… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18 Seven deadly sins — For other uses, see Seven Deadly Sins (disambiguation). Hieronymus Bosch s The Seven Deadly Sins and the Four Last Things The 7 Deadly Sins, also known as the Capital Vices or Cardinal Sins, is a classification of objectionable vices that have… …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 Greed — For other uses, see Greed (disambiguation). 1909 painting The Worship of Mammon by Evelyn De Morgan …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 Approbativeness — is a faculty from the discipline of Phrenology.DefinitionApprobativeness is closely related to Self esteem, but is clearly different: where Self esteem stands for pride, Approbativeness stands for vanity. It relates to the way a subject will… …

    Wikipedia


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