initiatory

  • 1 Initiatory — In*i ti*a*to*ry, a. 1. Suitable for an introduction or beginning; introductory; prefatory; as, an initiatory step. Bp. Hall. [1913 Webster] 2. Tending or serving to initiate; introducing by instruction, or by the use and application of symbols or …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Initiatory — In*i ti*a*to*ry, n. An introductory act or rite. [R.] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 initiatory — index elementary, incipient, initial, original (initial), precursory, preliminary, preparatory, prev …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 initiatory — 1610s, from L. initiat , stem of initiare (see INITIATE (Cf. initiate) (v.)) + ORY (Cf. ory) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 5 initiatory — [i nish′ē ə tôr ē, i nish′əə tôr ē] adj. 1. beginning; introductory; initial 2. of or used in an initiation …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 initiatory — adjective Date: circa 1615 1. constituting a beginning < initiatory proceedings > 2. tending or serving to initiate < initiatory rites > …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 7 initiatory — initiatorily /i nish ee euh tawr euh lee, tohr ; i nish ee euh tawr euh lee, tohr /, adv. /i nish ee euh tawr ee, tohr ee/, adj. 1. introductory; initial: an initiatory step toward a treaty. 2. serving to initiate or admit into a society, club,… …

    Universalium

  • 8 initiatory — /ɪˈnɪʃiətri/ (say i nisheeuhtree), / təri/ (say tuhree) adjective 1. introductory; initial: an initiatory step. 2. serving to initiate or admit into a society, etc. –initiatorily, adverb …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 9 initiatory — initiate ► VERB 1) cause (a process or action) to begin. 2) admit with formal ceremony or ritual into a society or group. 3) (initiate into) introduce to (a new activity or skill). ► NOUN ▪ a person who has been initiated. DERIVATIVES initiat …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 initiatory — adjective serving to set in motion the magazine s inaugural issue the initiative phase in the negotiations an initiatory step toward a treaty his first (or maiden) speech in Congress the liner s maiden voyage • Syn: ↑inaugural, ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 11 initiatory — adjective a) Of or pertaining to initiation b) inceptive, initial, inaugural or introductory …

    Wiktionary

  • 12 initiatory — Synonyms and related words: abecedarian, aboriginal, antecedent, antenatal, anterior, autochthonous, autodidactic, baptismal, beginning, budding, chief, coeducational, creative, cultural, didactic, disciplinary, edifying, educating, educational,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 13 initiatory — (Roget s Thesaurus II) adjective Of, relating to, or occurring at the start of something: beginning, inceptive, incipient, initial, introductory, leadoff. See START …

    English dictionary for students

  • 14 initiatory — in i·ti·a·to·ry || ɪ nɪʃətÉ”rɪ / trɪ adj. introductory, initial, beginning, opening; serving to initiate, pertaining to an initiation …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 15 initiatory — a. Initiative, inceptive …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 16 initiatory — adj initial, introductory, initiating, initiative, inaugural; elementary, fundamental, foundational, rudimentary; creative, formative, drawing board; incipient, inchoate, incunabular, beginning, commencing, starting, opening …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • 17 initiatory — ini·tia·to·ry …

    English syllables

  • 18 initiatory — in•i•ti•a•to•ry [[t]ɪˈnɪʃ i əˌtɔr i, ˌtoʊr i[/t]] adj. 1) introductory; initial 2) serving to initiate • Etymology: 1605–15 in•i ti•a•to′ri•ly, adv …

    From formal English to slang

  • 19 plaintiffs initiatory pleading — index complaint Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 20 Wicca — This article is about the duotheistic religion. For other uses, see Wicca (disambiguation). This pentacle, worn as a pendant, depicts a pentagram, or five pointed star, used as a symbol of Wicca by many adherents. Wicca (pronounced  …

    Wikipedia


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