go+over

  • 1 all over — {adv. phr.} 1. In every part; everywhere. * /He has a fever and aches all over./ * /I have looked all over for my glasses./ Compare: FAR AND WIDE. 2. {informal} In every way; completely. * /She is her mother all over./ 3. {informal} Coming into… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2 all over but the shouting — {adv. phr.,} {informal} Finally decided or won; brought to an end; not able to be changed. * /After Bill s touchdown, the game was all over but the shouting./ * /John and Tom both tried to win Jane, but after John s promotion it was all over but… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3 all over someone — See: FALL ALL OVER SOMEONE …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 4 bend over backward — or[lean over backward] {v. phr.}, {informal} To try so hard to avoid a mistake that you make the opposite mistake instead; do the opposite of something that you know you should not do; do too much to avoid doing the wrong thing; also, make a… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 5 be over — {v. phr.} To be ended; be finished. * /The show was over by 11 P.M./ * /The war will soon be over./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 6 blow over — {v.} To come to an end; pass away with little or no bad effects. * /The sky was black, as if a bad storm were coming, but it blew over and the sun came out./ * /They were bitter enemies for a while, but the quarrel blew over./ * /He was much… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 7 boil over — {v. phr.} 1. To rise due to boiling and overflow down the sides of a pan or a pot. * / Watch out! Jane cried. The milk is boiling over on the stove! / 2. To become enraged to the point of being unable to contain oneself. * /John took a lot of… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 8 bowl over — {v.}, {informal} 1. To knock down as if with a bowled ball. * /The taxi hit him a glancing blow and bowled him over./ 2. To astonish with success or shock with misfortune; upset; stun. * /He was bowled over by his wife s sudden death./ * /The… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 9 carry over — {v.} 1. To save for another time. * /The store had some bathing suits it had carried over from last year./ * /What you learn in school should carry over into adult life./ 2. To transfer (as a figure) from one column, page, or book to another. *… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 10 come over — {v.} To take control of; cause sudden strong feeling in; happen to. * /A sudden fit of anger came over him./ * /A great tenderness came over her./ * /What has come over him?/ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 11 cry over spilled milk — or[cry over spilt milk] {v. phr.}, {informal} To cry or complain about something that has already happened; be unhappy about something that cannot be helped. * /After the baby tore up Sue s picture book, Sue s mother told her there was no use… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 12 do over — {v. phr.} 1. To renovate; redecorate. * /The new owners are going to do over the entire building in the fall./ 2. To repeat. * /Please do that math problem over until you get it right./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 13 fall all over — {v. phr.}, {informal} To show too much love or thanks toward (someone). * /She must love him. Every time you see them, she s falling all over him./ * /When Bob found the lady s ring and returned it, she fell all over him./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14 fall over backwards — or[fall over oneself] {v. phr.} To do everything you can to please someone; try very hard to satisfy someone. * /The hotel manager fell over backwards to give the movie star everything she wanted./ * /The boys fell over themselves trying to get… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15 fall over yourself — See: FALL OVER BACKWARDS …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 16 fork over a lot of money — {v. phr.} To pay an excessive amount of money often unwillingly. * / According to my divorce decree, Alan complained, I have to fork over a lot of money to my ex wife every month. / …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 17 fork over — or[fork out] also[fork up] {v.} To pay; pay out. * /He had to fork over fifty dollars to have the car repaired./ Compare: HAND OVER …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 18 freeze over — {v.} To become covered with ice. * /The children wanted the lake to freeze over so they could ice skate./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 19 get over — {v.} 1. To finish. * /Tom worked fast to get his lesson over./ 2. To pass over. * /It was hard to get over the muddy road./ 3. To get well from; recover from. * /The man returned to work after he got over his illness./ 4. To accept or forget (a… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 20 get something over with — See: OVER WITH(1) …

    Dictionary of American idioms


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