get+used+to

  • 1 get used to — index inure (accustom), naturalize (acclimate) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 Get Used to It — Infobox Album | Name = Get Used To It Type = Studio album Artist = Rhino Bucket Released = Mar, 1992 Recorded = 1992 Genre = Heavy metal Hard rock Length = Label = Reprise Records Producer = Terry Manning Reviews = *Allmusic Rating|3|5… …

    Wikipedia

  • 3 get used to — See: USED TO …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 4 get\ used\ to — See: used to …

    Словарь американских идиом

  • 5 get used to it — Meaning Accept that what you want isn t going to be. Origin US origin …

    Meaning and origin of phrases

  • 6 get used to — become accustomed to …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 7 Can't Get Used to Losing You — Infobox Single Name = Can t Get Used to Losing You Artist = Andy Williams from Album = B side = Released = 1963 Format = Recorded = Genre = Length = Label = Writer = Jerome Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman Producer = Certification = Chart position =… …

    Wikipedia

  • 8 be/get used to — be or become familiar with through experience. → use …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 9 get accustomed — get used to …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 10 used to — used to1 [ just tu ] modal verb *** Used to is usually followed by an infinitive: We used to swim in the river. But sometimes the following infinitive is left out: I don t play golf now, but I used to. Used to only exists as a past tense.… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 11 get into the swing (of something) — informal phrase to become used to a new situation and to feel confident that you can deal with it I’ve been here a week, and I’m only just beginning to get into the swing of things. Thesaurus: to become familiar with a new situation or way of… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 12 get your sea legs — get (your) sea legs to get used to a new situation. After graduating from college he went to Chicago to get his sea legs by working in radio. Etymology: based on the literal meaning of getting used to being on a moving ship …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 13 get sea legs — get (your) sea legs to get used to a new situation. After graduating from college he went to Chicago to get his sea legs by working in radio. Etymology: based on the literal meaning of getting used to being on a moving ship …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 14 get into the swing of things — get (back) into the swing of things informal get used to (or return to) being easy and relaxed about an activity or routine one is engaged in …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 15 get in the swing (of something) — get in/into the ˈswing (of sth) idiom (informal) to get used to an activity or a situation and become fully involved in it • I ve only been here a week so I haven t got into the swing of things yet. Main entry: ↑swingidiom …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 16 used — I MODAL USES AND PHRASES ♦♦ (Pronounced [[t]ju͟ːst[/t]] in used 1, and [[t]ju͟ːzd[/t]] in used 2.) 1) PHR MODAL If something used to be done or used to be the case, it was done regularly in the past or was the case in the past. People used to… …

    English dictionary

  • 17 used to */*/*/ — I UK [ˈjuːst tuː] / US [ˈjust tu] modal verb Summary: Used to is usually followed by an infinitive: We used to swim in the river. But sometimes the following infinitive is left out: I don t play golf now, but I used to. Used to only exists as a… …

    English dictionary

  • 18 used to — adjective in the habit (Freq. 13) I am used to hitchhiking you ll get used to the idea ...was wont to complain that this is a cold world Henry David Thoreau • Syn: ↑wont to • Similar to: ↑accustomed …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 19 used — I /ju:st/ adj. (cannot stand alone) accustomed to be; get used to (she is used to working hard; to get used to hard work) II /ju:zd/ adj. employed used for (this machine is used for making copies) * * * [juːzd] get used to (she is used to working …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 20 get —    In Scotland and the north of England this is a dialectal word for a child, but it is always used contemptuously. The word is connected with the verb ‘to beget’; the child has been ‘get’, or ‘begotten’. ‘You havering slavering get’ is used by… …

    A dictionary of epithets and terms of address


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