enclose

  • 1 enclose — vb Enclose, envelop, fence, pen, coop, corral, cage, wall mean to surround so as to shut in or confine actually or apparently. Enclose implies a shutting in by barriers (as walls) or in an enveloping cover (as a case); the term may be used… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 2 enclose — [en klōz′, inklōz′] vt. enclosed, enclosing [ME enclosen, prob. < enclos, an enclosure < OFr, orig. pp. of enclore, to enclose < VL * inclaudere, for L includere, INCLUDE] 1. to shut in all around; hem in; fence in; surround 2. to insert …

    English World dictionary

  • 3 Enclose — En*close , v. t. [F. enclos, p. p. of enclore to enclose; pref. en (L. in) + clore to close. See {Close}, and cf. {Inclose}, {Include}.] To inclose. See {Inclose}. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 enclose — I verb blockade, bound, bracket, capture, cingere, circumscribe, circumvallate, close in, compass, confine, contain, embrace, encase, encincture, encircle, encompass, enfold, envelop, environ, fence in, gird, girdle, hem in, immure, impound,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 enclose — UK US /ɪnˈkləʊz/ verb [T] ► COMMUNICATIONS to include something inside a letter or parcel: »Apply in writing, enclosing a current CV, to the address below. »Please find enclosed an application form and information about the company …

    Financial and business terms

  • 6 enclose — early 14c., from EN (Cf. en ) (1) + CLOSE (Cf. close), and partially from O.Fr. enclos, pp. of enclore. Specific sense of to fence in waste or common ground for the purpose of cultivation or to give it to private owners, is from c.1500. Meaning… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 7 enclose — is the correct form for the word meaning ‘to close in, include, etc.’, not inclose …

    Modern English usage

  • 8 enclose — [v] put inside, surround blockade, block off, bound, box up, cage, circle, circumscribe, close in, confine, coop, corral, cover, encase, encircle, encompass, enfold, enshroud, environ, fence, fence off*, hedge, hem in*, imbue, immure, implant,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 enclose — (also inclose) ► VERB 1) surround or close off on all sides. 2) place in an envelope together with a letter. ORIGIN Old French enclore, from Latin includere shut in …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 enclose */ — UK [ɪnˈkləʊz] / US [ɪnˈkloʊz] verb [transitive] Word forms enclose : present tense I/you/we/they enclose he/she/it encloses present participle enclosing past tense enclosed past participle enclosed 1) to surround someone or something Her arms… …

    English dictionary

  • 11 enclose — Inclose In*close , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Inclosed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Inclosing}.] [See {Enclose}, and cf. {Include}.] [Written also {enclose}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To surround; to shut in; to confine on all sides; to include; to shut up; to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12 enclose — also inclose transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, probably from enclos enclosed, from Anglo French, past participle of enclore to enclose, from Vulgar Latin *inclaudere, alteration of Latin includere more at include Date: 14th century 1. a …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 13 enclose — verb ADVERB ▪ completely, fully, totally ▪ The non smoking section was completely enclosed in glass. ▪ partially PREPOSITION ▪ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 14 enclose — v. (D; tr.) to enclose in * * * [ɪn kləʊz] (D; tr.) to enclose in …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 15 enclose — [[t]ɪnklo͟ʊz[/t]] encloses, enclosing, enclosed 1) VERB If a place or object is enclosed by something, the place or object is inside that thing or completely surrounded by it. [be V ed in n] The rules state that samples must be enclosed in two… …

    English dictionary

  • 16 enclose — en•close [[t]ɛnˈkloʊz[/t]] v. t. closed, clos•ing 1) to close in on all sides; shut in 2) to surround, as with a fence: to enclose land[/ex] 3) to insert in the same envelope, package, etc.: to enclose a check[/ex] 4) to contain or hold •… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 17 enclose — /ɪn kləυz/ verb to put something inside an envelope with a letter ● to enclose an invoice with a letter ● I am enclosing a copy of the contract. ● Please find the cheque enclosed herewith. ● Please enclose a recent photograph with your CV …

    Marketing dictionary in english

  • 18 enclose — enclosable, adj. encloser, n. /en klohz /, v.t., enclosed, enclosing. 1. to shut or hem in; close in on all sides: a valley enclosed by tall mountains. 2. to surround, as with a fence or wall: to enclose land. 3. to insert in the same envelope,… …

    Universalium

  • 19 enclose — See enclose, inclose …

    Dictionary of problem words and expressions

  • 20 enclose — en|close [ınˈkləuz US ˈklouz] v [T] 1.) to put something inside an envelope as well as a letter ▪ Please enclose a cheque with your order. please find enclosed (=used in business letters to say that you are sending something with a letter) ▪… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English


We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.