distress

  • 1 distress — dis·tress n [Anglo French destrece, literally, tightness, anguish, deprivation, from Old French, ultimately from Late Latin districtus severe, from past participle of distringere to hinder, punish see distrain] 1: seizure and detention of the… …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 distress — n Distress, suffering, misery, agony, dolor, passion are comparable when denoting the state of one that is in great trouble or in pain of mind or body. Distress commonly implies conditions or circumstances that cause physical or mental stress or… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 3 Distress — Dis*tress , n. [OE. destresse, distresse, OF. destresse, destrece, F. d[ e]tresse, OF. destrecier to distress, (assumed) LL. districtiare, fr. L. districtus, p. p. of distringere. See {Distrain}, and cf. {Stress}.] 1. Extreme pain or suffering;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 distress — dis‧tress [dɪˈstres] noun [uncountable] LAW when someone s goods are taken with the permission of a court of law so that they can be sold to pay unpaid rent, bills etc: • The corporation had a power of absolute and immediate distress in the event …

    Financial and business terms

  • 5 Distress — may refer to: Distress (medicine), occurring when an individual cannot adapt to stress Suffering Distress signal, an internationally recognized means for obtaining help Distressed inventory, the process whereby materials are worn down by time and …

    Wikipedia

  • 6 Distress — Pays d’origine France Genre musical Doom metal Death mélodique Metal Années d activité 1996 …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 7 distress — [di stres′] vt. [ME distressen < OFr destrecier, orig., to constrain (to do something) < destrece, constraint < ML destrescia < L districtus, pp. of distringere: see DISTRAIN] 1. to cause sorrow, misery, or suffering to; pain 2. to… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 distress — [n1] pain, agony ache, affliction, anguish, anxiety, bad news*, blues*, care, concern, cross, dejection, desolation, disappointment, discomfort, disquietude, dolor, embarrassment, grief, headache, heartache, heartbreak, irritation, malaise,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 Distress — Dis*tress , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Distressed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Distressing}.] [Cf. OF. destrecier. See {Distress}, n.] 1. To cause pain or anguish to; to pain; to oppress with calamity; to afflict; to harass; to make miserable. [1913 Webster] We… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 distress — ► NOUN 1) extreme anxiety or suffering. 2) the state of a ship or aircraft when in danger or difficulty. 3) Medicine a state of physical strain, especially difficulty in breathing. ► VERB 1) cause distress to. 2) give (furniture, leather, etc.)… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 11 distress — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ acute, considerable, deep, extreme, great, immense (BrE), severe, significant ▪ genuine, real …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 12 distress — I n. 1)to feel; suffer distress 2) to alleviate, ease distress 3) deep, great, profound distress 4) economic, financial distress 5) distress at, over, with 6) to smb. s distress (to our distress, her condition did not improve) II v. (R) it… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 13 distress — distressingly, adv. /di stres /, n. 1. great pain, anxiety, or sorrow; acute physical or mental suffering; affliction; trouble. 2. a state of extreme necessity or misfortune. 3. the state of a ship or airplane requiring immediate assistance, as… …

    Universalium

  • 14 distress — A common law right of landlord, now regulated by statute, to seize a tenant s goods and chattels in a nonjudicial proceeding to satisfy an arrears of rent. The taking of goods and chattels out of the possession of a wrong doer into the custody of …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 15 distress — A common law right of landlord, now regulated by statute, to seize a tenant s goods and chattels in a nonjudicial proceeding to satisfy an arrears of rent. The taking of goods and chattels out of the possession of a wrong doer into the custody of …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 16 distress — I. noun Etymology: Middle English destresse, from Anglo French destresce, from Vulgar Latin *districtia, from Latin districtus, past participle of distringere Date: 13th century 1. a. seizure and detention of the goods of another as pledge or to… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17 distress — dis|tress1 [dıˈstres] n [U] [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: destresse, from Latin districtus, past participle of distringere to pull apart, prevent from acting or leaving ] 1.) a feeling of extreme unhappiness ▪ Luke s behaviour caused… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 distress — I UK [dɪˈstres] / US noun [uncountable] ** 1) a feeling that you have when you are very unhappy, worried, or upset I wouldn t want to cause her any distress. in distress: She d arrived on Gina s doorstep in obvious distress. 2) great pain 3) a… …

    English dictionary

  • 19 distress — dis|tress1 [ dı stres ] noun uncount ** 1. ) a feeling that you have when you are very unhappy, worried, or upset: I wouldn t want to cause her any distress. in distress: She d arrived on Gina s doorstep in obvious distress. a ) great pain 2. ) a …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 20 distress — 1 noun (U) 1 EXTREME WORRY a feeling of extreme worry and unhappiness: Luke s destructive behaviour caused his parents great distress. | in distress: The girl was crying and clearly in distress. 2 PAIN formal great physical pain 3 LACK OF… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English


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