abduction

  • 1 Abduction — • May be considered as a public crime and a matrimonial diriment impediment Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Abduction     Abduction      …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 2 abduction — [ abdyksjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1541; lat. abductio ♦ Physiol. Mouvement qui écarte un membre ou une partie quelconque du plan médian du corps. ⊗ CONTR. Adduction. ● abduction nom féminin (latin abductio, action d enlever, de séparer) Mouvement qui… …

    Encyclopédie Universelle

  • 3 ABDUCTION — (or Manstealing; Heb. גְּנֵבַת נֶפֶשׁ, genevat nefesh), stealing of a human being for capital gain. According to the Bible, abduction is a capital offense. He who kidnaps a man – whether he has sold him or is still holding him – shall be put to… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 4 abduction — ab·duc·tion /ab dək shən, əb / n 1 a: the action of abducting abduction of a robbery victim b: the tort or felony of abducting a person 2: the unlawful carrying away of a wife or female child or ward for the purpose of marriage or sexual… …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 Abduction — may refer to:Abduction of a person or people* Kidnapping, as a near synonym in criminal law, but sometimes used particularly in cases involving a woman or child ** Bride kidnapping ** Child abduction, the abduction or kidnapping of a young child… …

    Wikipedia

  • 6 Abduction — Título Sin salida (España) Identidad secreta (Argentina) Sin escape (México) Ficha técnica Dirección John Singleton Producción Doug Davison …

    Wikipedia Español

  • 7 Abduction — Ab*duc tion, n. [L. abductio: cf. F. abduction.] 1. The act of abducing or abducting; a drawing apart; a carrying away. Roget. [1913 Webster] 2. (Physiol.) The movement which separates a limb or other part from the axis, or middle line, of the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 abduction — (n.) 1620s, a leading away, from L. abductionem (nom. abductio), noun of action from pp. stem of abducere to lead away, take away (often by force), from ab away (see AB (Cf. ab )) + ducere to lead (see DUKE (Cf. duke) (n.)). The illegal activity… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 9 abduction — (18c) is the forcible leading away of a minor (with or without the minor s consent) for marriage or seduction or the breaking of a legal custodial arrangement for the children of divorced parents. Although there is some overlap in meaning with… …

    Modern English usage

  • 10 abduction — [n] taking away by force appropriation, kidnapping, rape, seizure, theft; concepts 90,139 …

    New thesaurus

  • 11 abduction — [ab duk′shən, əbduk′shən] n. [LL abductio: see ABDUCT] 1. an abducting or being abducted 2. Law the carrying off of a person by force or fraud; esp., the kidnapping of a woman for marriage, prostitution, etc. 3. Physiol. a) an abducting of a part …

    English World dictionary

  • 12 Abduction — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Sur les autres projets Wikimedia : « Abduction », sur le Wiktionnaire (dictionnaire universel) En épistémologie, l’abduction est un procédé …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 13 Abduction — No less an authority than Merriam Webster s Collegiate Dictionary defines abduction as (1) the action of abducting: the condition of being abducted (and) (2) the unlawful carrying away of a woman for marriage or intercourse. In medicine, the word …

    Medical dictionary

  • 14 abduction — abduction1 /ab duk sheuhn/, n. 1. act of abducting. 2. the state of being abducted. 3. Law. the illegal carrying or enticing away of a person, esp. by interfering with a relationship, as the taking of a child from its parent. [1620 30; ABDUCT +… …

    Universalium

  • 15 abduction — noun /əbˈdʌk.ʃən,æbˈdʌk.ʃən/ a) The act of abducing or abducting; a drawing apart; a carrying away. the abduction of a child b) The movement which separates a limb or other part from the axis, or middle line, of the body. The significance of such …

    Wiktionary

  • 16 abduction — Term introduced by Peirce for the process of using evidence to reach a wider conclusion, as in inference to the best explanation . Peirce described abduction as a creative process, but stressed that the results are subject to rational evaluation …

    Philosophy dictionary

  • 17 abduction — (ab du ksion) s. f. Terme d anat. Mouvement qui écarte un membre ou une partie quelconque du plan mitoyen qu on suppose partager le corps longitudinalement en deux moitiés semblables ou symétriques. Pour la main et le pied, plusieurs anatomistes… …

    Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • 18 abduction — The offense of taking away a wife, child, or ward, by fraud and persuasion, or open violence. Model Penal Code, No. 212.4. To take away surreptitiously by force in kidnapping. The unlawful taking or detention of any female for purposes of… …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 19 abduction — The offense of taking away a wife, child, or ward, by fraud and persuasion, or open violence. Model Penal Code, No. 212.4. To take away surreptitiously by force in kidnapping. The unlawful taking or detention of any female for purposes of… …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 20 abduction — noun Abduction is used after these nouns: ↑child …

    Collocations dictionary


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