Sign

  • 1 give the high sign — See: HIGH SIGN …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2 high sign — {n. phr.}, {informal} A silent signal of recognition, greeting, or warning; an open or secret signal between two persons. Used with get or give . * /The Joneses saw us across the hotel dining room and gave us the high sign./ * /John could see… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3 Indian sign — {n.}, {informal} A magic spell that is thought to bring bad luck; curse; jinx; hoo doo. Used with the , usually after have or with ; and often used in a joking way. * /Bill is a good player, but Ted has the Indian sign on him and always beats him …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 4 road sign — {n.} A sign on which there is information about a road or places; a sign with directions to drivers. * /The road sign read, 25 MPH LIMIT but Jack drove along at fifty miles an hour./ * /The road sign said Westwood was four miles away./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 5 sign — See: HIGH SIGN, INDIAN SIGN, ROAD SIGN …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 6 sign in — {v.} To write your name on a special list or in a record book to show that you are present. * /Every worker must sign in when coming back to work./ * /Teachers go to the office and sign in each morning before going to their classrooms./ Contrast… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 7 sign off — {v.} 1. To end a program on radio or television. * /That TV newscaster always signs off by saluting./ 2. To stop broadcasting for the day. * /That TV station always signs off after the late movie./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 8 sign of the times — {n. phr.} A characteristic of the times in which one lives. * /It is a sad sign of the times that all the major lakes and rivers are badly polluted and fish in them are poisoned./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 9 sign on — {v. phr.} 1. To sign an agreement to become an employee. * /The new cowboys signed on with the wealthy rancher in Nevada./ 2. To start a radio or television broadcast. * /Station WLAK signs on every morning at 6 A.M./ Contrast: SIGN OFF …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 10 sign one's own death warrant — {v. phr.} To cause your own death or the loss of something you want very much. * /Mr. Carter had lung trouble, and the doctor told him he would sign his own death warrant if he didn t stop smoking./ * /When Jim s fiancee saw him on a date with… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 11 sign on the dotted line — {v. phr.} To attach one s signature on an important document, such as a contract, a bill of sales, etc. * /The seller said to the buyer, All you need to do is sign on the dotted line. / …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 12 sign out — {v.} To write your name on a special list or in a record book to show that you are leaving a place. * /Most of the students sign out on Friday./ Contrast SIGN IN …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 13 sign up — {v.} 1. To promise to do something by signing your name; join; sign an agreement. * /We will not have the picnic unless more people sign up./ * /John wants to sign up for the contest./ * /Miss Carter has signed up to be the chaperone at the dance …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14 give the high sign — See: HIGH SIGN …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15 high sign — {n. phr.}, {informal} A silent signal of recognition, greeting, or warning; an open or secret signal between two persons. Used with get or give . * /The Joneses saw us across the hotel dining room and gave us the high sign./ * /John could see… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 16 Indian sign — {n.}, {informal} A magic spell that is thought to bring bad luck; curse; jinx; hoo doo. Used with the , usually after have or with ; and often used in a joking way. * /Bill is a good player, but Ted has the Indian sign on him and always beats him …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 17 road sign — {n.} A sign on which there is information about a road or places; a sign with directions to drivers. * /The road sign read, 25 MPH LIMIT but Jack drove along at fifty miles an hour./ * /The road sign said Westwood was four miles away./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 18 sign — See: HIGH SIGN, INDIAN SIGN, ROAD SIGN …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 19 sign in — {v.} To write your name on a special list or in a record book to show that you are present. * /Every worker must sign in when coming back to work./ * /Teachers go to the office and sign in each morning before going to their classrooms./ Contrast… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 20 sign off — {v.} 1. To end a program on radio or television. * /That TV newscaster always signs off by saluting./ 2. To stop broadcasting for the day. * /That TV station always signs off after the late movie./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms


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