Delicate

  • 1 Delicate — Del i*cate, a. [L. delicatus pleasing the senses, voluptuous, soft and tender; akin to deliciae delight: cf. F. d[ e]licat. See {Delight}.] 1. Addicted to pleasure; luxurious; voluptuous; alluring. [R.] [1913 Webster] Dives, for his delicate life …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 delicate — [del′i kit] adj. [ME delicat < L delicatus, giving pleasure, delightful < * delicare, for OL delicere, to allure, entice < de , intens. + lacere: see DELIGHT] 1. pleasing in its lightness, mildness, subtlety, etc. [a delicate flavor,… …

    English World dictionary

  • 3 delicate — [adj1] dainty, weak aerial, balmy, breakable, choice, delectable, delicious, delightful, elegant, ethereal, exquisite, faint, filmy, fine, fine grained, finespun, flimsy, fracturable, fragile, frail, frangible, gauzy, gentle, gossamery, graceful …

    New thesaurus

  • 4 Delicate — may refer to: Delicate (song), a 1993 single by Terence Trent D Arby featuring Des ree Delicate (album), an album by Martha The Muffins Delicate , a single by Damien Rice from the album O This disambiguation page lists articles associated with… …

    Wikipedia

  • 5 delicate — ► ADJECTIVE 1) very fine in texture or structure. 2) easily broken or damaged; fragile. 3) susceptible to illness or adverse conditions. 4) requiring sensitive or careful handling. 5) skilful; deft. 6) (of food or drink) subtly and pleasantly… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6 Delicate — Del i*cate, n. 1. A choice dainty; a delicacy. [R.] [1913 Webster] With abstinence all delicates he sees. Dryden. [1913 Webster] 2. A delicate, luxurious, or effeminate person. [1913 Webster] All the vessels, then, which our delicates have, those …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 délicaté — délicaté, ée (dé li ka té, tée) part. passé. Un enfant trop délicaté …

    Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • 8 Delicāte — (Delicatemente, ital.), mit Zartheit vorzutragen …

    Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • 9 delicate — index destructible, impalpable, intricate, nonsubstantial (not sturdy), palatable, precarious, subtle (refined) …

    Law dictionary

  • 10 delicate — (adj.) late 14c., self indulgent, loving ease; delightful; sensitive, easily hurt; feeble, from L. delicatus alluring, delightful, dainty, also addicted to pleasure, luxurious, effeminate; of uncertain origin; related by folk etymology (and… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 11 delicate — exquisite, dainty, rare, *choice, recherché, elegant Analogous words: delectable, *delightful, delicious: *soft, gentle, mild, lenient, balmy: ethereal, *airy, aerial Antonyms: gross Contrasted words: *coarse …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 12 delicaté — Delicaté, [delicat]ée. part. pass …

    Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • 13 delicate — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English delicat, from Latin delicatus given to self indulgence, fastidious, subtly pleasing, not robust; akin to Latin delicere to allure Date: 14th century 1. pleasing to the senses: a. generally pleasant < the… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 14 delicate — [[t]de̱lɪkət[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED: usu ADJ n Something that is delicate is small and beautifully shaped. He had delicate hands. ...an evergreen tree with large flame coloured leaves and delicate blossom. Syn: dainty Derived words: delicately ADV… …

    English dictionary

  • 15 delicate — delicately, adv. delicateness, n. /del i kit/, adj. 1. fine in texture, quality, construction, etc.: a delicate lace collar. 2. fragile; easily damaged; frail: delicate porcelain; a delicate child. 3. so fine as to be scarcely perceptible; subtle …

    Universalium

  • 16 delicate — del|i|cate [ delıkət ] adjective ** 1. ) something that is delicate can easily be damaged or broken: Delicate skin must be protected from the sun. a ) someone who is delicate is rather weak and often sick 2. ) a delicate situation needs to be… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 17 delicate */*/ — UK [ˈdelɪkət] / US adjective 1) something that is delicate can easily be damaged or broken Delicate skin must be protected from the sun. 2) someone who is delicate is rather weak and often ill 3) attractive and thin, small, light, or graceful The …

    English dictionary

  • 18 delicate — del|i|cate [ˈdelıkıt] adj [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: delicatus] 1.) needing to be dealt with carefully or sensitively in order to avoid problems or failure ▪ There s something I have to speak to you about it s a delicate matter . ▪… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19 delicate — 01. Grandma s health is quite [delicate], and she has to be careful not to catch a cold. 02. The little girl held her new baby brother [delicately] in her arms. 03. The flower has very [delicate] petals, so be careful when you re holding it. 04.… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 20 delicate — del•i•cate [[t]ˈdɛl ɪ kɪt[/t]] adj. 1) fine in texture, quality, construction, etc 2) fragile; easily damaged; frail 3) so fine as to be scarcely perceptible; subtle: a delicate flavor[/ex] 4) soft or faint, as color 5) fine or precise in action… …

    From formal English to slang


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