i'm taking off!

  • 1 Taking-off — Tak ing off , n. 1. Removal; murder. See {To take off} (c), under {Take}, v. t. [1913 Webster] The deep damnation of his taking off. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. (Print.) The removal of sheets from the press. [Eng.] [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 3. Act of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 take off — {v. phr.} 1a. To leave fast; depart suddenly; run away. * /The dog took off after a rabbit./ Compare: LIGHT OUT. 1b. {informal} To go away; leave. * /The six boys got into the car and took off for the drug store./ 2. To leave on a flight, begin… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3 take off — {v. phr.} 1a. To leave fast; depart suddenly; run away. * /The dog took off after a rabbit./ Compare: LIGHT OUT. 1b. {informal} To go away; leave. * /The six boys got into the car and took off for the drug store./ 2. To leave on a flight, begin… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 4 Assisted take off — is any system for helping aircraft into the air (as opposed to strictly under its own power). The reason it might be needed is due to the aircraft s weight exceeding the normal maximum take off weight, insufficient power, or the available runway… …

    Wikipedia

  • 5 The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974 film) — Infobox Film | name = The Taking of Pelham One Two Three caption = original film poster by Mort Künstler director = Joseph Sargent producer = Edgar J. Scherick writer = John Godey (novel) Peter Stone starring = Walter Matthau Jerry Stiller Martin …

    Wikipedia

  • 6 Barking irons — Bark ing i rons 1. Instruments used in taking off the bark of trees. Gardner. [1913 Webster] 2. A pair of pistols. [Slang] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 Damnation — Dam*na tion, n. [F. damnation, L. damnatio, fr. damnare. See {Damn}.] 1. The state of being damned; condemnation; openly expressed disapprobation. [1913 Webster] 2. (Theol.) Condemnation to everlasting punishment in the future state, or the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 Flap — Flap, n. [OE. flappe, flap, blow, bly flap; cf. D. flap, and E. flap, v.] Anything broad and limber that hangs loose, or that is attached by one side or end and is easily moved; as, the flap of a garment. [1913 Webster] A cartilaginous flap upon… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9 Flap tile — Flap Flap, n. [OE. flappe, flap, blow, bly flap; cf. D. flap, and E. flap, v.] Anything broad and limber that hangs loose, or that is attached by one side or end and is easily moved; as, the flap of a garment. [1913 Webster] A cartilaginous flap… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 Flap valve — Flap Flap, n. [OE. flappe, flap, blow, bly flap; cf. D. flap, and E. flap, v.] Anything broad and limber that hangs loose, or that is attached by one side or end and is easily moved; as, the flap of a garment. [1913 Webster] A cartilaginous flap… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11 floatplane — n. a plane equipped with pontoons for landing or taking off from water. Syn: pontoon plane, seaplane. [WordNet 1.5] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12 launcher — n. 1. a device capable of launching a rocket. Syn: rocket launcher. [WordNet 1.5] 2. A device which launches aircraft from an aircraft carrier; it provides additional velocity to the airplane, to supplement that from the airplane s engines, so… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13 Offtake — Off take , n. [Off + take.] 1. Act of taking off; specif., the taking off or purchase of goods. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 2. Something taken off; a deduction. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 3. A channel for taking away air or water; also, the point of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14 Scummer — Scum mer, n. [Cf. OF. escumoire, F. [ e]cumoire. See {Scum}, and cf. {Skimmer}.] An instrument for taking off scum; a skimmer. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15 Scumming — Scum ming, n. (a) The act of taking off scum. (b) That which is scummed off; skimmings; scum; used chiefly in the plural. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 Topsoiling — Top soil ing, n. (Engin.) The act or art of taking off the top soil of land before an excavation or embankment is begun. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17 Triangular — Tri*an gu*lar, a. [L. triangularis: cf. F. triangulaire.] 1. Having three angles; having the form of a triangle. [1913 Webster] 2. (Bot.) Oblong or elongated, and having three lateral angles; as, a triangular seed, leaf, or stem. [1913 Webster]… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 Triangular compasses — Triangular Tri*an gu*lar, a. [L. triangularis: cf. F. triangulaire.] 1. Having three angles; having the form of a triangle. [1913 Webster] 2. (Bot.) Oblong or elongated, and having three lateral angles; as, a triangular seed, leaf, or stem. [1913 …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19 Triangular crab — Triangular Tri*an gu*lar, a. [L. triangularis: cf. F. triangulaire.] 1. Having three angles; having the form of a triangle. [1913 Webster] 2. (Bot.) Oblong or elongated, and having three lateral angles; as, a triangular seed, leaf, or stem. [1913 …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20 Triangular numbers — Triangular Tri*an gu*lar, a. [L. triangularis: cf. F. triangulaire.] 1. Having three angles; having the form of a triangle. [1913 Webster] 2. (Bot.) Oblong or elongated, and having three lateral angles; as, a triangular seed, leaf, or stem. [1913 …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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