etruscan architecture

  • 21 Rocca (architecture) — Throughout Italy the rocca of a small town is the high, fortifiable stronghold, the rock beneath or on which the village or town clustered, within which its inhabitants might take refuge at times of trouble; under its owners patronage the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 22 NATIVE AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE —    Although most Native Americans today have abandoned their traditional homes in favor of housing based on European models, textual and visual sources can tell us much about the earliest truly American dwellings. Native Americans inhabited North …

    Historical Dictionary of Architecture

  • 23 Tomb of Orcus — For the moon also designated Orcus I, see Vanth (moon). A diagram of the Tomb of Orcus, showing the two chambers and two dromes (entrances). The Tomb of Orcus (Italian: Tomba dell Orco), sometimes called the Tomb of Murina (Italian: Tomba dei… …

    Wikipedia

  • 24 Axel Boëthius — (born Arvika, Sweden July 18, 1889; died Rome, Italy May 7, 1969) was a scholar and archaeologist of the Etruscan culture. Boëthius was primarily a student of Etruscan and Italic architecture.As a student, Boëthius studied at the Uppsala… …

    Wikipedia

  • 25 LITERARY SOURCES —    The literary sources of the Etruscans, sometimes misleadingly described as the ancient sources, were very limited. Some authors, such as Livy and Theopompus, remark on Etruscan women. There is some discussion of Etruscan architecture in the… …

    Historical Dictionary of the Etruscans

  • 26 BOETHIUS, Axel — (1889–1969)    The first director of the Swedish Institute in Rome (1925), which built up an enviable reputation in Etruscan research. He himself is best known for his posthumously published contribution on Etruscan architecture (1970), written… …

    Historical Dictionary of the Etruscans

  • 27 VITRUVIUS POLLIO, Marcus — (first century BC)    The Roman architectural writer, best known for his De Re Architectura, who defined various attributes of Etruscan architecture, including the Tuscan order …

    Historical Dictionary of the Etruscans

  • 28 Haruspex — Etruscan inscriptions on the bronze sheep s liver of Piacenza In Roman and Etruscan religious practice, a haruspex (plural haruspices; Latin auspex, plural auspices) was a man trained to practice a form of divination called haruspicy, hepatoscopy …

    Wikipedia

  • 29 Ceramic art — Etruscan: Diomedes and Polyxena, from the Etruscan amphora of the Pontic group, ca. 540–530 BC. From Vulci …

    Wikipedia

  • 30 TOMBS —    Etruscan funerary architecture and furniture used to dominate all perceptions of the Etruscans and there is a wealth of information about tombs. A distinctive feature of tombs is that they are generally placed on the approaches to cities and… …

    Historical Dictionary of the Etruscans

  • 31 Western sculpture — ▪ art Introduction       three dimensional artistic forms produced in what is now Europe and later in non European areas dominated by European culture (such as North America) from the Metal Ages (Europe, history of) to the present.       Like… …

    Universalium

  • 32 painting, Western — ▪ art Introduction       history of Western painting from its beginnings in prehistoric times to the present.       Painting, the execution of forms and shapes on a surface by means of pigment (but see also drawing for discussion of depictions in …

    Universalium

  • 33 ancient Italic people — ▪ people Introduction       any of the peoples diverse in origin, language, traditions, stage of development, and territorial extension who inhabited pre Roman Italy, a region heavily influenced by neighbouring Greece (ancient Greek civilization) …

    Universalium

  • 34 Funerary art — Tomb of Philippe Pot, governor of Burgundy under Louis XI …

    Wikipedia

  • 35 Italy — /it l ee/, n. a republic in S Europe, comprising a peninsula S of the Alps, and Sicily, Sardinia, Elba, and other smaller islands: a kingdom 1870 1946. 57,534,088; 116,294 sq. mi. (301,200 sq. km). Cap.: Rome. Italian, Italia. * * * Italy… …

    Universalium

  • 36 Rome — /rohm/, n. 1. Harold (Jacob), born 1908, U.S. lyricist and composer. 2. Italian, Roma. a city in and the capital of Italy, in the central part, on the Tiber: ancient capital of the Roman Empire; site of Vatican City, seat of authority of the… …

    Universalium

  • 37 ancient Rome — ▪ ancient state, Europe, Africa, and Asia Introduction       the state centred on the city of Rome. This article discusses the period from the founding of the city and the regal period, which began in 753 BC, through the events leading to the… …

    Universalium

  • 38 Glossary of ancient Roman religion — This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries. Ancient Roman religion …

    Wikipedia

  • 39 metalwork — metalworker, n. /met l werrk /, n. objects made of metal. [1840 50; METAL + WORK] * * * Useful and decorative objects fashioned of various metals. The oldest technique is hammering. After с 2500 BC, casting was also used, molten metal being… …

    Universalium

  • 40 Europe, history of — Introduction       history of European peoples and cultures from prehistoric times to the present. Europe is a more ambiguous term than most geographic expressions. Its etymology is doubtful, as is the physical extent of the area it designates.… …

    Universalium

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