epoch

  • 121 Calciferous epoch — Calciferous Cal*cif er*ous, a. [L. calx, calcis, lime + ferous.] Bearing, producing, or containing calcite, or carbonate of lime. [1913 Webster] {Calciferous epoch} (Geol.), an epoch in the American lower Silurian system, immediately succeeding… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 122 Cauda galli epoch — Cauda galli Cau da gal*li, . [L., tail of a cock.] (Paleon.) A plume shaped fossil, supposed to be a seaweed, characteristic of the lower Devonian rocks; as, the cauda galli grit. [1913 Webster] {Cauda galli epoch} (Geol.), an epoch at the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 123 Chazy epoch — Cha*zy ep och (Geol.) An epoch at the close of the Canadian period of the American Lower Silurian system; so named from a township in Clinton Co., New York. See the Diagram under {Geology}. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 124 Cincinnati epoch — Cin cin*na ti ep och (Geol.) An epoch at the close of the American lower Silurian system. The rocks are well developed near Cincinnati, Ohio. The group includes the Hudson River and Lorraine shales of New York. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 125 Drift epoch — Drift Drift, a. That causes drifting or that is drifted; movable by wind or currents; as, drift currents; drift ice; drift mud. Kane. [1913 Webster] {Drift anchor}. See {Sea anchor}, and also {Drag sail}, under {Drag}, n. {Drift epoch} (Geol.),… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 126 Elephantine epoch — Elephantine El e*phan tine, a. [L. elephantinus of ivory, Gr. ?: cf. F. [ e]l[ e]phantin.] Pertaining to the elephant, or resembling an elephant (commonly, in size); hence, huge; immense; heavy; as, of elephantine proportions; an elephantine step …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 127 Julian epoch — Julian Jul ian (?; 277) a. [L. Julianus, fr. Julius. Cf. {July}, {Gillian}.] Relating to, or derived from, Julius C[ae]sar. [1913 Webster] {Julian calendar}, the calendar as adjusted by Julius C[ae]sar, in which the year was made to consist of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 128 Terrace epoch — Terrace Ter race, n. [F. terrasse (cf. Sp. terraza, It. terrazza), fr. L. terra the earth, probably for tersa, originally meaning, dry land, and akin to torrere to parch, E. torrid, and thirst. See {Thirst}, and cf. {Fumitory}, {Inter}, v.,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 129 Marnian Epoch — was the name given by G. de Mortillet to the period usually called in France the Gallic, which extends from about five centuries before the Christian era to the conquest of Gaul by Caesar. M. de Mortillet objects to the term Gallic, as the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 130 Quantum gravity epoch — In physical cosmology, the quantum gravity epoch is the first era in the history of the Universe according to the standard Big Bang cosmology. In this era, the effects of quantum gravity such as fluctuating topology of space are commonplace. The… …

    Wikipedia

  • 131 Ochoan epoch — The Ochoan epoch was a stage of the Permian geologic period. The Ochoan epoch occurred during the Changhsingian Age. This post Guadalupian strata is known for high levels of evaporite deposits …

    Wikipedia

  • 132 Middle Bronze Age Cold Epoch — The Middle Bronze Age Cold Epoch was a period of unusually cold climate in the North Atlantic region, lasting from about 1800 BC to about 1500 BC.[1] It was followed by the Bronze Age Optimum. During that epoch, a series of severe volcanic… …

    Wikipedia

  • 133 Hesperian epoch — noun The second of the three Martian geologic epochs, approximately from 3,500 million years ago to 1,800 million years ago, marked by lava flows, preceded by the Noachian epoch, and followed by the Amazonian epoch …

    Wiktionary

  • 134 glacial epoch — /gleɪʃəl ˈipɒk/ (say glayshuhl eepok) noun 1. any of the glaciations of past geological periods as in Australia during the Permian. 2. the glacial epoch, the geologically recent Pleistocene epoch, during which much of the Northern Hemisphere was… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 135 Julian epoch — (J)    a measure of time used in astronomy. The word epoch comes from Greek, and means a fixed or standard instant of time. Other times are stated with reference to this fixed time using years and fractions of years. In 1984, astronomers agreed… …

    Dictionary of units of measurement

  • 136 Holocene epoch — noun approximately the last 10,000 years • Syn: ↑Holocene, ↑Recent, ↑Recent epoch • Instance Hypernyms: ↑epoch • Part Holonyms: ↑Quaternary, ↑Quaternary period, ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 137 Pleistocene epoch — noun from two million to 11 thousand years ago; extensive glaciation of the northern hemisphere; the time of human evolution • Syn: ↑Pleistocene, ↑Glacial epoch • Instance Hypernyms: ↑epoch • Part Holonyms: ↑Quaternary, ↑Quat …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 138 Recent epoch — noun approximately the last 10,000 years • Syn: ↑Holocene, ↑Holocene epoch, ↑Recent • Instance Hypernyms: ↑epoch • Part Holonyms: ↑Quaternary, ↑Quaternary period, ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 139 Antiochian epoch — Antiochian An ti*o chi*an, a. 1. Pertaining to Antiochus, a contemporary with Cicero, and the founder of a sect of philosophers. [1913 Webster] 2. Of or pertaining to the city of Antioch, in Syria. [1913 Webster] {Antiochian epoch} (Chron.), a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 140 Genesee epoch — Gen e*see ep och (Geol.) The closing subdivision of the Hamilton period in the American Devonian system; so called because the formations of this period crop out in Genesee, New York. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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