do amiss

  • 1 amiss — amiss, astray share the meaning wrong or otherwise than intended. Amiss implies failure (as of an arrow) to reach the mark aimed at and frequently suggests a shortcoming or defect (as by failure to reach a standard, an expectation, a definite… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 2 Amiss — A*miss , adv. [Pref. a + miss.] Astray; faultily; improperly; wrongly; ill. [1913 Webster] What error drives our eyes and ears amiss? Shak. [1913 Webster] Ye ask and receive not, because ye ask amiss. James iv. 3. [1913 Webster] {To take (an act …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 amiss — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ not quite right; inappropriate. ► ADVERB ▪ wrongly or inappropriately. ● not go amiss Cf. ↑not go amiss ● take amiss Cf. ↑take amiss …

    English terms dictionary

  • 4 Amiss — A*miss ([.a]*m[i^]s ), a. Wrong; faulty; out of order; improper; as, it may not be amiss to ask advice. Note: [Used only in the predicate.] Dryden. [1913 Webster] His wisdom and virtue can not always rectify that which is amiss in himself or his… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 Amiss — A*miss , n. A fault, wrong, or mistake. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Each toy seems prologue to some great amiss. Shak. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 amiss — (adv.) mid 13c., amis off the mark, also out of order, lit. on the miss, from a in, on (see A (Cf. a ) (1)) + missen fail to hit (see MISS (Cf. miss) (v.)). To take (something) amiss originally (late 14c.) was to miss the meaning of (see …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 7 amiss — [adj] wrong; defective awry, bad, confused, crooked, erring, erroneous, fallacious, false, faulty, flawed, foul, glitched up*, haywire, imperfect, improper, inaccurate, inappropriate, incorrect, mistaken, out of order, sick, unfair, unlawful,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 8 amiss — index astray, defective, disordered, errant, erroneous, faulty, improper, inaccurate, inappropriate …

    Law dictionary

  • 9 amiss — [ə mis′] adv. [ME amis, on mis: see A 1 & MISS1] in a wrong way; astray, wrongly, faultily, improperly, etc. adj. wrong, faulty, improper, etc.: used only in the predicate …

    English World dictionary

  • 10 amiss — a|miss1 [əˈmıs] adj [not before noun] [Date: 1200 1300; Origin: miss mistake, failure ] if something is amiss, there is a problem = ↑wrong ▪ Elsa continued as if nothing was amiss. amiss with/in ▪ There s something amiss in their relationship.… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 11 amiss — [[t]əmɪ̱s[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED: v link ADJ If you say that something is amiss, you mean there is something wrong. Their instincts warned them something was amiss... Something is radically amiss in our health care system. Syn: wrong 2) PHRASE: V… …

    English dictionary

  • 12 amiss — 1 adverb 1 sth would not come/go amiss informal used to say that something would be suitable or useful in a situation: A cup of tea wouldn t go amiss. 2 take sth amiss to feel upset or offended about something that someone has said or done 2… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 amiss — /əˈmɪs / (say uh mis) adverb 1. out of the proper course or order; in a faulty manner; wrongly: * Yes, yes; we both wanted to make our own of her, and I think we did not do amiss, considering –catherine helen spence, 1867. –adjective 2. (used… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 14 amiss — a|miss1 [ ə mıs ] adjective never before noun likely to cause difficulties or problems: Convinced that something was amiss, her family insisted she see a doctor. amiss a|miss 2 [ ə mıs ] adverb go amiss to develop in a way that is wrong, not… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 15 amiss — /euh mis /, adv. 1. out of the right or proper course, order, or condition; improperly; wrongly; astray: Did I speak amiss? 2. take amiss, to be offended at or resentful of (something not meant to cause offense or resentment); misunderstand: I… …

    Universalium

  • 16 amiss — I UK [əˈmɪs] / US adjective [never before noun] likely to cause difficulties or problems I was convinced that something was amiss. II UK [əˈmɪs] / US adverb something would not go/come amiss British used for saying that something would be welcome …

    English dictionary

  • 17 amiss — predic.adj. & adv. predic.adj. wrong; out of order; faulty (knew something was amiss). adv. wrong; wrongly; inappropriately (everything went amiss). Phrases and idioms: take amiss be offended by (took my words amiss). Etymology: ME prob. f. ON… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 18 amiss — I. adverb Date: 13th century 1. a. in a mistaken way ; wrongly < if you think he is guilty, you judge amiss > b. astray < something had gone amiss > 2. in a faulty way ; imperfectly …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19 amiss — adj., adv. (formal) 1) to take smt. amiss 2) to go amiss * * * [ə mɪs] (formal) to take smt. amiss to go …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 20 amiss — 1. adjective /əˈmɪs/ Wrong; faulty; out of order; improper; as, it may not be amiss to ask advice. He suspected something was amiss. 2. adverb /əˈmɪs/ a) Mistakenly …

    Wiktionary

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