Uncouth

  • 141 Surprised — Surprise Sur*prise , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Surprised}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Surprising}.] [From {Surprise}, n.: cf. F. surprendre, p. p. surpris.] 1. To come or fall suddenly and unexpectedly; to take unawares; to seize or capture by unexpected attack …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 142 Surprising — Surprise Sur*prise , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Surprised}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Surprising}.] [From {Surprise}, n.: cf. F. surprendre, p. p. surpris.] 1. To come or fall suddenly and unexpectedly; to take unawares; to seize or capture by unexpected attack …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 143 To father on — Father Fa ther, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Fathered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Fathering}.] 1. To make one s self the father of; to beget. [1913 Webster] Cowards father cowards, and base things sire base. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To take as one s own child; to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 144 To father upon — Father Fa ther, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Fathered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Fathering}.] 1. To make one s self the father of; to beget. [1913 Webster] Cowards father cowards, and base things sire base. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To take as one s own child; to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 145 Toil — Toil, v. t. 1. To weary; to overlabor. [Obs.] Toiled with works of war. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To labor; to work; often with out. [R.] [1913 Webster] Places well toiled and husbanded. Holland. [1913 Webster] [I] toiled out my uncouth passage.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 146 Unco — Un co, a. [Scot. The same word as E. uncouth.] Unknown; strange, or foreign; unusual, or surprising; distant in manner; reserved. [Scot.] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 147 Ungainly — Un*gain ly, a. [OE. ungeinliche, adv., fr. ungein inconvenient; un + Icel. gegn ready, serviceable; adv., against, opposite. See {Un } not, and {Gain}, a., {Again}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not gainly; not expert or dexterous; clumsy; awkward; uncouth; …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 148 Unketh — Un*keth , a. Uncouth. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 149 Wharl — Wharl, Wharling Wharl ing, n. A guttural pronunciation of the letter r; a burr. See {Burr}, n., 6. [1913 Webster] A strange, uncouth wharling in their speech. Fuller. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 150 Wharling — Wharl Wharl, Wharling Wharl ing, n. A guttural pronunciation of the letter r; a burr. See {Burr}, n., 6. [1913 Webster] A strange, uncouth wharling in their speech. Fuller. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 151 boorish — adjective Date: 1562 resembling or befitting a boor (as in crude insensitivity) • boorishly adverb • boorishness noun Synonyms: boorish, churlish, loutish, clownish mean uncouth in manners or appearance. boorish …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 152 clodhopper — noun Date: 1709 1. a clumsy and uncouth rustic 2. a large heavy work shoe or boot …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 153 couthie — adjective Etymology: Middle English couth familiar, from Old English cūth more at uncouth Date: 1719 chiefly Scottish pleasant, kindly …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 154 kith — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cȳthth; akin to cūth known more at uncouth Date: before 12th century familiar friends, neighbors, or relatives < kith and kin > …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 155 refine — verb (refined; refining) Date: 1582 transitive verb 1. to free (as metal, sugar, or oil) from impurities or unwanted material 2. to free from moral imperfection ; elevate 3. to improve or perfect by pruning or polishing < refine a poetic style >… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 156 rude — adjective (ruder; rudest) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French, from Latin rudis; probably akin to Latin rudus rubble Date: 14th century 1. a. being in a rough or unfinished state ; crude < rude line illustrations > b. natural, raw …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 157 selcouth — adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English seldcūth, from seldan seldom + cūth known more at uncouth Date: before 12th century archaic unusual, strange …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 158 villain — noun Etymology: Middle English vilain, vilein, from Anglo French, from Medieval Latin villanus, from Latin villa Date: 14th century 1. villein 2. an uncouth person ; boor 3. a deliberate scoundrel or criminal 4. a character in a story or play who …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 159 Gothic — I. adjective Date: 1591 1. a. of, relating to, or resembling the Goths, their civilization, or their language b. Teutonic, Germanic c. medieval 1 d. uncouth, barbarous 2. a. of, relating to, or having the characteristics of a style …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 160 ape — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English apa; akin to Old High German affo ape Date: before 12th century 1. a. monkey; especially one of the larger tailless or short tailed Old World forms b. any of two families (Pongidae and… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary


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