Solicitation+of+votes

  • 181 line up — {v. phr.} 1. To take places in a line or formation; stand side by side or one behind another; form a line or pattern. * /The boys lined up and took turns diving off the springboard./ * /The football team lined up in a T formation./ 2. To put in… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 182 majority leader — {n.} The leader of the political party with the most votes in a legislative house. * /The majority leader of the House of Representatives tried to get the members of his party to support the bill./ Compare: MINORITY LEADER …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 183 make a play for — {v. phr.}, {slang} To try to get the interest or liking of; flirt with; attract. * /Bob made a play for the pretty new girl./ * /John made a play for the other boys votes for class president./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 184 minority leader — {n. phr.} The leader of the political party that has fewer votes in a legislative house. * /The minority leader of the Senate supported the bill./ * /The minority leader in the House of Representatives held a caucus./ Compare: MAJORITY LEADER …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 185 neither fish nor fowl — also[neither fish, flesh, nor fowl] Something or someone that does not belong to a definite group or known class; a strange person or thing; someone or something odd or hard to understand. * /The man is neither fish nor fowl; he votes Democrat or …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 186 nose out — {v.}, {informal} 1. To learn by effort (something private or secret); uncover. * /The principal nosed out the truth about the stolen examination./ 2. To defeat by a nose length; come in a little ahead of in a race or contest. * /The horse we… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 187 show of hands — {n. phr.} An open vote during a meeting when those who vote yes and those who vote no hold up their hands to be counted. * /The chairman said, I d like to see a show of hands if we re ready for the vote. / …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 188 take the stump — or[take to the stump] {v. phr.} To travel around to different places making political speeches. * /The men running for president took to the stump to attract votes./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 189 vote a straight ticket — {v. phr.} To not differentiate one s ballot according to individual names and posts, but to vote for all candidates for all positions of the same party. * / I never have time.to study the ballot in detail, Marie said, and so I tend to vote a… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 190 Affirmative — Af*firm a*tive, n. 1. That which affirms as opposed to that which denies; an affirmative proposition; that side of question which affirms or maintains the proposition stated; opposed to {negative}; as, there were forty votes in the affirmative,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 191 Ambition — Am*bi tion, n. [F. ambition, L. ambitio a going around, especially of candidates for office is Rome, to solicit votes (hence, desire for office or honor), fr. ambire to go around. See {Ambient}, {Issue}.] 1. The act of going about to solicit or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 192 Ambitus — Am bi*tus ([a^]m b[i^]*t[u^]s), n. [L. See {Ambit}, {Ambition}.] 1. The exterior edge or border of a thing, as the border of a leaf, or the outline of a bivalve shell. [1913 Webster] 2. (Rom. Antiq.) A canvassing for votes. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 193 Asking — Ask ing, n. 1. The act of inquiring or requesting; a petition; solicitation. Longfellow. [1913 Webster] 2. The publishing of banns. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 194 Australian ballot — Aus*tra li*an bal lot (Law) A system of balloting or voting in public elections, originally used in South Australia, in which there is such an arrangement for polling votes that secrecy is compulsorily maintained, and the ballot used is an… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 195 Aye — Aye, n. An affirmative vote; one who votes in the affirmative; as, To call for the ayes and noes; The ayes have it. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 196 Bale tie — Tie Tie, n.; pl. {Ties}. [AS. t[=e]ge, t?ge, t[=i]ge. [root]64. See {Tie}, v. t.] 1. A knot; a fastening. [1913 Webster] 2. A bond; an obligation, moral or legal; as, the sacred ties of friendship or of duty; the ties of allegiance. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 197 Ballot — Bal lot (b[a^]l l[u^]t), n. [F. ballotte, fr. It. ballotta. See {Ball} round body.] [1913 Webster] 1. Originally, a ball used for secret voting. Hence: Any printed or written ticket used in voting. [1913 Webster] 2. The act of secret voting,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 198 Ballot box — Ballot Bal lot (b[a^]l l[u^]t), n. [F. ballotte, fr. It. ballotta. See {Ball} round body.] [1913 Webster] 1. Originally, a ball used for secret voting. Hence: Any printed or written ticket used in voting. [1913 Webster] 2. The act of secret… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 199 Balloter — Bal lot*er, n. One who votes by ballot. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 200 Barnstorm — Barn storm , v. i. & t. [Barn + storm, v.] 1. To travel from place to place, making brief stops. [PJC] 2. To fly an airplane from place to place, usually at small airports, doing flying stunts or flying passengers for sightseeing, for the purpose …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.