Solicitation+of+votes

  • 161 Myspace — Type Private Founded …

    Wikipedia

  • 162 SEC Form DEFR14C — A revision to form DEFA14C. This form is a definitive information statement that discloses important information but is not connected to the solicitation of proxy votes. The information contained in a DEFA14C (or DEFR14C) form can cover a… …

    Investment dictionary

  • 163 campaign — Synonyms and related words: action, activity, all out campaign, campaign button, campaign commitments, campaign contribution, campaign fund, canvass, cause, circuit, commitment, compete, competition, contest, course, cruise, crusade, drive,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 164 canvass — Synonyms and related words: Australian ballot, Hare system, address, addresses, agitate, air, all out campaign, analyze, angle for, argue, assemblage, assembly, autopsy, aye, ballot, bid for, call up, campaign, campaign button, campaign… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 165 Glasgow —    GLASGOW, a city, the seat of a university, and a sea port, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the Lower ward of the county of Lanark, and situated in longitude 4° 15 51 (W.), and latitude 55° 52 10 (N.), 23 miles (E. by S.) from Greenock …

    A Topographical dictionary of Scotland

  • 166 lobby — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. foyer, hall, vestibule; lobbyism; pressure group, bloc, party, lobbyists, advocates. See receptacle, influence. v. solicit, ask favors; promote, bring pressure [to bear]; plump for, root for, pull… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 167 canvass — v 1. solicit votes, campaign, electioneer, poll, survey; request, ask for, bespeak, invite; apply for, appeal for, petition for, beg for, beseech, entreat, implore; press, urge, push. 2. investigate, inquire into, look into, U.S. check into or up …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • 168 baby kisser — {n.}, {slang} A person campaigning for votes in his quest for elected political office; such persons often kiss little children in public. * /Nixon was a baby kisser when he ran for Vice President with Eisenhower./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 169 cut into — {v.} 1. To make less; reduce. * /The union made the company pay higher wages, which cut into the profits./ * /The other houses got old and shabby, and that cut into the value of his house./ * /At first Smith led in votes, but more votes came in… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 170 line up — {v. phr.} 1. To take places in a line or formation; stand side by side or one behind another; form a line or pattern. * /The boys lined up and took turns diving off the springboard./ * /The football team lined up in a T formation./ 2. To put in… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 171 majority leader — {n.} The leader of the political party with the most votes in a legislative house. * /The majority leader of the House of Representatives tried to get the members of his party to support the bill./ Compare: MINORITY LEADER …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 172 make a play for — {v. phr.}, {slang} To try to get the interest or liking of; flirt with; attract. * /Bob made a play for the pretty new girl./ * /John made a play for the other boys votes for class president./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 173 minority leader — {n. phr.} The leader of the political party that has fewer votes in a legislative house. * /The minority leader of the Senate supported the bill./ * /The minority leader in the House of Representatives held a caucus./ Compare: MAJORITY LEADER …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 174 neither fish nor fowl — also[neither fish, flesh, nor fowl] Something or someone that does not belong to a definite group or known class; a strange person or thing; someone or something odd or hard to understand. * /The man is neither fish nor fowl; he votes Democrat or …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 175 nose out — {v.}, {informal} 1. To learn by effort (something private or secret); uncover. * /The principal nosed out the truth about the stolen examination./ 2. To defeat by a nose length; come in a little ahead of in a race or contest. * /The horse we… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 176 show of hands — {n. phr.} An open vote during a meeting when those who vote yes and those who vote no hold up their hands to be counted. * /The chairman said, I d like to see a show of hands if we re ready for the vote. / …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 177 stuff the ballot box — {v. phr.} To give more votes to a candidate in an election than there are people who actually voted for him. * /It is a crime to stuff the ballot box./ [ballot stuffing] {adj. phr.} …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 178 take the stump — or[take to the stump] {v. phr.} To travel around to different places making political speeches. * /The men running for president took to the stump to attract votes./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 179 vote a straight ticket — {v. phr.} To not differentiate one s ballot according to individual names and posts, but to vote for all candidates for all positions of the same party. * / I never have time.to study the ballot in detail, Marie said, and so I tend to vote a… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 180 baby kisser — {n.}, {slang} A person campaigning for votes in his quest for elected political office; such persons often kiss little children in public. * /Nixon was a baby kisser when he ran for Vice President with Eisenhower./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms


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