language

noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French langage, from lange, langue tongue, language, from Latin lingua — more at tongue Date: 14th century 1. a. the words, their pronunciation, and the methods of combining them used and understood by a community b. (1) audible, articulate, meaningful sound as produced by the action of the vocal organs (2) a systematic means of communicating ideas or feelings by the use of conventionalized signs, sounds, gestures, or marks having understood meanings (3) the suggestion by objects, actions, or conditions of associated ideas or feelings <
language in their very gesture — Shakespeare
>
(4) the means by which animals communicate (5) a formal system of signs and symbols (as FORTRAN or a calculus in logic) including rules for the formation and transformation of admissible expressions (6) machine language 1 2. a. form or manner of verbal expression; specifically style b. the vocabulary and phraseology belonging to an art or a department of knowledge c. profanity 3. the study of language especially as a school subject 4. specific words especially in a law or regulation <
added language prohibiting further development along the river
>

New Collegiate Dictionary. 2001.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Language — Lan guage, n. [OE. langage, F. langage, fr. L. lingua the tongue, hence speech, language; akin to E. tongue. See {Tongue}, cf. {Lingual}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Any means of conveying or communicating ideas; specifically, human speech; the expression …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Language — Lan guage, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Languaged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Languaging}.] To communicate by language; to express in language. [1913 Webster] Others were languaged in such doubtful expressions that they have a double sense. Fuller. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Language — This article is about the properties of language in general. For other uses, see Language (disambiguation). Cuneiform is one of the first known forms of written language, but spoken language is believed to predate writing by tens of thousands of… …   Wikipedia

  • Language education — Language Teaching redirects here. For the journal, see Language Teaching (journal). Linguistics …   Wikipedia

  • Language attrition — is the loss of a first or second language or a portion of that language by individuals; it should be distinguished from language loss within a community (the latter process is referred to as language shift or language death). Language attrition… …   Wikipedia

  • Language revitalization — is the attempt by interested parties, including individuals, cultural or community groups, governments, or political authorities, to recover the spoken use of a language that is endangered, moribund, or no longer spoken. Language death is the… …   Wikipedia

  • Language immersion — is a method of teaching a second language (also called L2, or the target language). Unlike a more traditional language course, where the target language is simply the subject material, language immersion uses the target language as a teaching… …   Wikipedia

  • Language delay — is a failure to develop language abilities on the usual developmental timetable. Language delay is distinct from speech delay, in which the speech mechanism itself is the focus of delay. Thus, language delay refers specifically to a delay in the… …   Wikipedia

  • Language contact — occurs when two or more languages or varieties interact. The study of language contact is called contact linguistics. Multilingualism has likely been common throughout much of human history, and today most people in the world are multilingual.[1] …   Wikipedia

  • Language module — refers to a hypothesized structure in the human brain (anatomical module) or cognitive system (functional module) that some psycholinguists (e.g., Steven Pinker) claim contains innate capacities for language. According to Jerry Fodor the sine qua …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.