List of UNIVAC products

This is a list of UNIVAC products.

The Remington Rand years (1950 to 1955)

Calculating devices

*UNIVAC 60
*UNIVAC 120

Computer systems

*UNIVAC I
*UNIVAC 1101
*UNIVAC 1102
*UNIVAC 1103

Peripherals

torage

* UNISERVO tape drive

Display and print

*UNIVAC High speed printer 600 line/min printer

Offline tape handling units

*UNIPRINTER 10 char/s printer with tape drive
*UNITYPER keyboard with tape drive
*UNIVAC Tape to Card converter card punch with tape drive
*UNIVAC Card to Tape converter card reader with tape drive
*UNIVAC Paper Tape to Tape converter paper tape reader with tape drive

The Sperry Rand years (1955 to 1978)

Calculating devices

*UNIVAC 1004
*UNIVAC 1005

Computer systems

Embedded systems

*AN/USQ-17 – the Naval Tactical Data System (NTDS) or M-460
*AN/USQ-20 – updated NTDS, aka UNIVAC 1206 or G-40
*AN/UYK-7 – multiprocessor for Aegis. 32 bit replacement for the Naval Tactical Data System, derived from UNIVAC 1108
*AN/UYK-8 – dual processor version of the Naval Tactical Data System
*AN/UYK-20
*UNIVAC 1218 – real time computer
*UNIVAC 1230 – later, faster (2×) version of the AN/USQ-20 (memory size and I/O were identical)

Word machines

*LARC
*UNIVAC Solid State
*UNIVAC II
*UNIVAC III
*UNIVAC 418 – real time computer
*UNIVAC 418-II – real time computer
*UNIVAC 418-III – real time computer
*UNIVAC 490 – commercial adaptation of AN/USQ real-time system
*UNIVAC 492
*UNIVAC 494
*UNIVAC 494-MAPS – The first Multi-Associated Processor System - not made available commercially
*UNIVAC 1103A
*UNIVAC 1104
*UNIVAC 1105
*UNIVAC 1106 (half-speed 1108)
*UNIVAC 1107
*UNIVAC 1108
*UNIVAC 1110
*UNIVAC 1100/10
*UNIVAC 1100/20
*UNIVAC 1100/40
*UNIVAC 1100/80
*UNIVAC 1100/181

Variable word length machines

*UNIVAC 1050

Byte machines

These machines implemented a variant of the IBM System/360 architecture
*UNIVAC 9200
*UNIVAC 9300
*UNIVAC 9400 and Univac 9480

Peripherals

torage

*FASTRAND drum drive
*UNISERVO II tape drive
*UNISERVO IIA tape drive
*UNISERVO III tape drive
*UNISERVO IIIC tape drive
*UNISERVO VIII-C tape drive

Display and print

*Uniscope

Communication

*UNIVAC BP - Buffer Processor; used as communications front-end to 418 and 490

oftware

Operating systems and system software

* EXEC I
* EXEC II
* EXEC 8

Utilities, languages, and development aids

*CALL Macro Processor (CALL)
*CSHELL Command Shell (CSHELL)
*Conversational TimeSharing (CTS)
*Univac Text Editor (ED)
*Full-Screen Editor (FSED)
*Interactive Processing Facility (IPF)
*Logically Integrated FORTRAN Translator (LIFT)
*Symbolic Stream Generator (SSG)
*Table of Contents Editor (TOCED)
*UEDIT (UEDIT)
*Client Server Development (UTS-400 COBOL)
*"Database" software (MAPPER (Software))
*Programming Language for UNISYS Systems (PLUS)
*Master File Directory (MFD)
*SX1100 UNIX on OS2200

Applications

*USAS

The Sperry Corporation years (1978 to 1986)

*UNIVAC 1100/60
*UNIVAC 1100/70
*UNIVAC 1100/90
*UNIVAC 90/30
*UNIVAC 90/60
*UNIVAC 90/70
*UNIVAC 90/80
*UNIVAC Integrated Scientific Processor (ISP)

External links

* [http://people.cs.und.edu/~rmarsh/CLASS/CS451/HANDOUTS/os-unisys.pdf A history of Univac computers and Operating Systems]
* [http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/univac/CPU_timeline.txt UNIVAC CPU Timeline (1950-1980)]


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