David B. Samadi

Dr. David B. Samadi is the Vice Chairman of the Department of Urology and Chief of Robotics and Minimally Invasive Surgery at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.[1] He is a board-certified urologist and an oncologist specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of urologic diseases, prostate cancer, kidney cancer and bladder cancer, and specializes in advanced minimally invasive treatments for prostate cancer, including laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and laparoscopic robotic radical prostatectomy.[2]

Contents

Biography

In 1979, at age 16, Samadi and his younger brother fled Iran after the overthrow of the Shah's government.[3] They grew up and were educated in the Persian Jewish communities of Belgium and London. Samadi completed high school in Roslyn, NY. After high school, Samadi attended the State University of New York at Stony Brook and earned his degree in biochemistry on a full scholarship. The diversity of his background has greatly benefited his medical practice and his interactions with patients from all over the world.

Career, education and training

Samadi completed his postgraduate training in general surgery at Montefiore Medical Center and in urology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center. He completed an oncology fellowship in urology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a robotic radical prostatectomy fellowship at Henri Mondor Hospital Creteil in France under the mentorship of Professor Claude Abbou, MD. Along with Dr. Abbou, Samadi performed the first 11 da Vinci robotic prostate surgeries in the world. Dr. Samadi is fellowship trained in laparoscopy and robotic prostatectomy surgery and is an internationally recognized expert in both fields.

He is one of the very few urologic surgeons in the United States trained in oncology, open, laparoscopic, and robotic surgery. He is also the first surgeon in the United States to successfully perform a robotic surgery redo.[4] To date, Samadi has performed over 3,600 da Vinci prostate surgeries, more than any other prostate cancer surgeon in all of New York. As a result of his surgical experience, Samadi is considered a leader and pioneer in robotic surgery.

Having completed fellowship training in both urologic oncology and laparoscopy, Samadi's technique as described below builds on oncologic principles learned with open radical prostatectomy and transferred to a robotic approach.[5] In the technique he uses at Mount Sinai, he recreates the classic open anatomic technique as closely as possible on the robotic platform. With the technique, he is able to achieve continence rates of 97% and potency rates of 81% at 1 year, while maintaining a 4% rate of positive surgical margins.[6]

Samadi developed his unique SMART (Samadi Modified Advanced Robotic Technique) surgical technique after years of perfecting his successful robotic surgery method, which improves sexual function as well as urinary control. The signature of Samadi's SMART Surgery program is that he performs the entire surgery at one time, from beginning to the end. For this reason, patients from all over the world seek his expertise. Samadi currently performs the SMART surgical technique at Mount Sinai, but has demonstrated it worldwide, most recently in Athens, Greece, Israel and other European countries. In December 2010, Samadi became the first surgeon to perform a live SMART surgery robotic prostatectomy at Rambam Medical Center in Haifa, northern Israel, and Tel Hashomer Hospital in Tel Aviv, Israel.

About robotic prostatectomy

Robotic prostatectomy is the latest in minimally invasive surgery, offering the most recent advances in robotics and computer technology for a patient with prostate cancer. The main benefits include a shorter hospital stay, keyhole incisions, little pain, low risk of bleeding and infection, quick healing, small scars, and minimal risk of becoming impotent or incontinent.[7]

The surgery is performed entirely by the surgeon, who sits at a console in the operating room and views the surgery on an enhanced 3D High Definition monitor. The surgeon uses joysticks that track movements, which are then translated in real-time to the scaled movements of a robotic device that enables the operation to take place. The ends of the robotic arms are fitted with miniature surgical instruments that are capable of moving in any direction. The EndoWrist instruments can be directed with extreme accuracy and precision.

The da Vinci Surgical System allows surgeons to operate for longer periods of time with less fatigue and virtually no hand tremor. It provides delicate handling of the prostate tissue permitting extremely accurate cutting of nerve tissue. Five small quarter sized incisions are made into the patient’s abdomen, three on one side of the navel and two on the other side. The fine robotic arms equipped with tiny surgical instruments enter through these ports and do the surgery. There is no computer programming of surgical instructions.

As an added benefit, this system completely removes any cancer cells that are at the surrounding edge of the prostate. The elimination of any malignant cells at the surgical margins is critical to patient recovery.[8] After the incision sites have healed, patients report a return of their sexual drive and their ability to attain an erection during sexual intercourse.[9] They are also able to regain control of their bladder and report no problems with urination.

Patients report minimal discomfort after robotic surgery as opposed to traditional open surgery which involves large traumatic incisions to the patient, requires a longer healing time with the possibility of infection at the surgical site and considerable scarring. With the da Vinci system, the small one-centimeter keyhole incisions allow for enhanced surgical maneuvers that would be impossible manually.

Professional activities, memberships and distinctions

Samadi is founder and Director of Mount Sinai's Robotic Fellowship Program.[10] It is dedicated to clinical and surgical excellence by providing exceptional opportunities for doctors who have completed their residency to train directly with Samadi. Fellows usually will spend a year working as a full-time, paid assistant to Samadi. All surgeries are performed by Samadi. Fellowships are awarded based on merit, along with potential to contribute to the fields of urology, oncology, and minimally invasive surgery.

The Robotic Fellowship Program has three components: Medical research, clinical training with an emphasis on robotic, laparoscopic, and renal surgical methods, and treatment of urological diseases; which includes prostate, bladder, and kidney cancers.

Samadi frequently presents his clinical research at medical conferences as a subject matter expert nationally and internationally.[11] He has been a guest speaker in major academic lecture series'. Over the past decade, Samadi has been actively involved in training and proctoring urologists across the country and internationally.[12]

Samadi is a member of the American Urological Association and the American Medical Association. Samadi is included in Castle Connolly Medical's America's Top Doctors. New York Magazine named Samadi to their Best Doctors List in 2009. Samadi is also a contributor on the panel of Fox News' Medical "A-Team".

Publications

  • Lavery, Hugh J.; Mikulasovich, Michael; Nabizada-Pace, Fatima; Samadi, David B.; Unger, Pamela; Xiao, Guang–Qian (2010). "Mohs surgery of the prostate: the utility of in situ frozen section analysis during robotic prostatectomy". Department of Urology, the Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, and Department of Pathology, the Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY. 
  • Brajtbord, Jonathan S.; Jacob, Brian P.; Lavery, Hugh J.; Mccash, Samuel; Samadi, David B. (2010). "Continuing Robotically? The Completion of a Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy After Laparotomy". Journal of Endourology 24 (10): 1613–1616. doi:10.1089/end.2009.0528. PMID 20858052. 
  • Brajtbord, Jonathan S.; Lavery, Hugh J.; Nabizada-Pace, Fatima; Senaratne, Prathibha; Samadi, David B. (2010). "Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging has limited clinical ability to preoperatively predict pT3 prostate cancer". Department of Urology, the Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY. 
  • Brajtbord, Jonathan; Lavery, Hugh J.; Moskovic, Daniel J.; Nabizada-Pace, Fatima; Rehman, Jamil; Samadi, David B. (2010). "High body mass index does not affect outcomes following robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy". Department of Urology, the Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY. 
  • Brajtbord, Jonathan S.; Lavery, Hugh J.; Levinson, Adam W.; Nabizada-Pace, Fatima; Pollard, Matthew E.; Samadi, David B. (2010). "Unnecessary Imaging for the Staging of Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Is Common". Ambulatory & Office Urology. 
  • Carlucci, John R.; Nabizada-Pace, Fatima; Samadi, David B. (2009). "What PCPs and geriatricians need to know about robotic prostatectomy and organ-confined prostate cancer". Geriatrics 64 (2): 8–14. PMID 19256581. 
  • Rehman, Jameel; Chughtai, Bilal; Schulsinger, David; Adler, Howard; Khan, S. Ali; Samadi, David (2008). "A percutaneous subcostal approach for intercostal stones". Journal of endourology 22 (3): 497–502. doi:10.1089/end.2007.0263. PMID 18298314. 
  • Herman, MP; Raman, JD; Dong, S; Samadi, D; Scherr, DS (2007). "Increasing body mass index negatively impacts outcomes following robotic radical prostatectomy". JSLS 11 (4): 438–42. PMC 3015841. PMID 18246641. http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3015841. 
  • Raman, JD; Dong, S; Levinson, A; Samadi, D; Scherr, DS (2007). "Robotic radical prostatectomy: operative technique, outcomes, and learning curve". JSLS 11 (1): 1–7. PMC 3015817. PMID 17651548. http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3015817. 
  • Capodice, Jillian L.; Jin, Zhezhen; Bemis, Debra L.; Samadi, David; Stone, Brian A.; Kapan, Steven; Katz, Aaron E. (2007). "A pilot study on acupuncture for lower urinary tract symptoms related to chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain". Chinese medicine 2: 1. doi:10.1186/1749-8546-2-1. PMC 1800847. PMID 17284322. http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1800847. 
  • Samadi, David; Levinson, Adam; Hakimi, Ari; Shabsigh, Ridwan; Benson, Mitchell C. (2007). "From proficiency to expert, when does the learning curve for robotic-assisted prostatectomies plateau? The Columbia University experience". World journal of urology 25 (1): 105–10. doi:10.1007/s00345-006-0137-4. PMID 17192816. 
  • Rehman, Jamil; Boglia, Joseph; Chughtai, Bilal; Sukkarieh, Troy; Khan, Sardar A.; Lewis, Richard; Darras, Frank; Wadhwa, Nand K. et al. (2006). "High body mass index in muscular patients and flank position are risk factors for rhabdomyolysis: case report after laparoscopic live-donor nephrectomy". Journal of endourology 20 (9): 646–50. doi:10.1089/end.2006.20.646. PMID 16999617. 
  • Rehman, Jamil; Ragab, Maged M.; Venkatesh, Ramakrishna; Sundaram, Chandru P.; Khan, S. Ali; Sukkarieh, Troy; Samadi, David; Chughtai, Bilal et al. (2004). "Smooth-muscle regeneration after electrosurgical endopyelotomy in a porcine model as confirmed by electron microscopy". Journal of endourology 18 (10): 982–8. doi:10.1089/end.2004.18.982. PMID 15801366. 
  • Rehman, Jamil; Chughtai, Bilal; Guru, Khurshid; Samadi, David; Khan, S. Ali (2008). "Laparoscopic extravesical ureteroneocystostomy by a new 'Y' flap technique". Journal of endourology 22 (8): 1701–3. doi:10.1089/end.2007.0346. PMID 18721047. 
  • Hoznek, András; Zaki, Safwat K.; Samadi, David B.; Salomon, Laurent; Lobontiu, Adrian; Lang, Philippe; Abbou, Clément-Claude (2002). "Robotic assisted kidney transplantation: an initial experience". The Journal of urology 167 (4): 1604–6. doi:10.1016/S0022-5347(05)65162-2. PMID 11912372. 
  • Hoznek, András; Samadi, David B.; Salomon, Laurent; de la Taille, Alexandre; Olsson, Leif E.; Abbou, Clément-Claude (2002). "Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: published series". Current urology reports 3 (2): 152–8. doi:10.1007/s11934-002-0028-1. PMID 12084208. 

References

  1. ^ "Mount Sinai Medical Center: David B. Samadi, MD Physician Profile". http://www.mountsinai.org/patient-care/service-areas/urological-conditions-and-surgery/areas-of-care/robotic-prostate-surgery/david-b-samadi-md. 
  2. ^ "Mount Sinai Faculty Practice Associates: David B. Samadi, MD Physician Profile". http://www.mountsinaifpa.org/profiles/david-b-samadi. 
  3. ^ Gupte, Pranay (January 17, 2006). "Doctor Discusses Plans To Perform Tele-Surgery". The New York Sun. http://www.nysun.com/new-york/doctor-discusses-plans-to-perform-tele-surgery/25973/. 
  4. ^ "The Mount Sinai Medical Center Names New Vice-Chair of Department of Urology". http://www.mountsinai.org/about-us/newsroom/press-releases/the-mount-sinai-medical-center-names-new-vice-chair-of-department-of-urology. 
  5. ^ Gainsburg, Daniel M.; Wax, David; Reich, David L.; Carlucci, John R.; Samadi, David B. (2010). "Intraoperative Management of Robotic-Assisted Versus Open Radical Prostatectomy". JSLS, Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons 14: 1–5. doi:10.4293/108680810X12674612014266. 
  6. ^ Samadi, David B.; Muntner, Paul; Nabizada-Pace, Fatima; Brajtbord, Jonathan S.; Carlucci, John; Lavery, Hugh J. (2010). "Improvements in robot-assisted prostatectomy: the effect of surgeon experience and technical changes on oncologic and functional outcomes". Journal of endourology 24 (7): 1105–10. doi:10.1089/end.2010.0136. PMID 20624081. 
  7. ^ Lavery, HJ; Nabizada-Pace, F; Carlucci, JR; Brajtbord, JS; Samadi, DB (2010). "Nerve-sparing robotic prostatectomy in preoperatively high-risk patients is safe and efficacious". Urologic oncology. doi:10.1016/j.urolonc.2009.11.023. PMID 20189844. 
  8. ^ Akhavan, Ardavan; Levinson, Adam W.; Muntner, Paul; Nabizada-Pace, Fatima; Samadi, David B. (2009). "Risk stratification and early oncologic outcomes following robotic prostatectomy". JSLS 13 (4): 515–21. doi:10.4293/108680809X12589998404164. PMC 3030785. PMID 20202392. http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3030785. 
  9. ^ "Is There Sex After Surgery? Yes - If You Choose the Right Procedure" (Press release). Intuitive Surgical. December 14, 2007. http://www.davinciprostatectomy.com/experiences/articles_samadi.aspx. 
  10. ^ "Mount Sinai Medical Center: David B. Samadi, Associate Professor Urology". http://www.mountsinai.org/profiles/david-b-samadi. 
  11. ^ Hoznek, András; Samadi, David B.; Salomon, Laurent; Olsson, Leif E.; Saint, Fabien; Chopin, Dominique; Abbou, Clément-Claude (2002). "Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy". Current urology reports 3 (2): 141–7. doi:10.1007/s11934-002-0026-3. PMID 12084206. 
  12. ^ Hoznek, András; Samadi, David B.; Salomon, Laurent; de la Taille, Alexandre; Olsson, Leif E.; Abbou, Clément-Claude (2002). "Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: published series". Current urology reports 3 (2): 152–8. doi:10.1007/s11934-002-0028-1. PMID 12084208. 

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