Nara bugyō

Nara bugyō (奈良奉行?) were officials of the Tokugawa shogunate in Edo period Japan. Appointments to this prominent office were usually fudai daimyō, but this was amongst the senior administrative posts open to those who were not daimyō.[1] Conventional interpretations have construed these Japanese titles as "commissioner" or "overseer" or "governor."

This bakufu tile identifies an official responsible for administration of the pre-Heian capital city of Nara. The numbers of men holding the title concurrently would vary over time.[1]

Contents

Shogunal city

During this period, Nara ranked with the largest urban centers, some of which were designated as a "shogunal city." The number of such cities rose from three to eleven under Tokugawa administration.[2]

List of Nara bugyō

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Beasley, William G. (1955). Select Documents on Japanese Foreign Policy, 1853-1868, p. 325.
  2. ^ Cullen, Louis M. (2003). A History of Japan, 1582-1941: Internal and External Worlds, p. 159.

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bugyō — nihongo|Bugyō|奉行|, often translated as commissioner or magistrate or governor, was a title assigned to government officers in pre modern Japan; other terms would be added to the title to describe more specifically a given commissioner s tasks or… …   Wikipedia

  • Bugyō — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Bugyō (奉行, Bugyō?), traducido comúnmente como comisionado , magistrado o gobernador era un título asignado a oficiales gubernamentales en el Japón feudal. Otros términos que se añadían al título describían más… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Nagasaki bugyō — A bird s eye view of Nagasaki harbor as published in the Illustrated London News (March 23, 1853). In the center the fan shape of the Dutch traders Dejima island compound and the Chinese compound is shown just to the left, separated from each… …   Wikipedia

  • Osaka machi-bugyō — (大阪町奉行, Osaka machi bugyō?) were officials of the Tokugawa shogunate in Edo period Japan. Appointments to this prominent office were usually fudai daimyō, but this was amongst the senior administrative posts open to those who were not daimyō.[1]… …   Wikipedia

  • Niigata bugyō — (新潟奉行?) were officials of the Tokugawa shogunate in Edo period Japan. Appointments to this prominent office were usually fudai daimyō, but this was amongst the senior administrative posts open to those who were not daimyō.[1] Conventional… …   Wikipedia

  • Nikkō bugyō — (日光奉行?) were officials of the Tokugawa shogunate in Edo period Japan. Appointments to this prominent office were usually fudai daimyō, but this was amongst the senior administrative posts open to those who were not daimyō.[1] Conventional… …   Wikipedia

  • Machi-bugyō — were officials of the Tokugawa shogunate in Edo period Japan. Appointments to this prominent office were usually fudai daimyō, but this was amongst the senior administrative posts open to those who were not daimyō.Beasley, William G. (1955).… …   Wikipedia

  • Sakai bugyō — were officials of the Tokugawa shogunate in Edo period Japan. Appointments to this prominent office were usually fudai daimyō.Beasley, William G. (1955). Select Documents on Japanese Foreign Policy, 1853 1868, p. 325.] Conventional… …   Wikipedia

  • Bakumatsu — History of Japan Samurai of the Satsuma clan. Paleolithic 35,000–14,000 BC Jōmon period 14,000–300 BC Yayoi period 300 BC–250 AD …   Wikipedia

  • Rōjū — The Rōjū (老中?), usually translated as Elder, was one of the highest ranking government posts in Tokugawa Japan. The term refers either to individual Elders, or to the Council as a whole; under the first two shoguns, there were only two Rōjū. The… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.