Yaaku language


Yaaku language

language
name=Yaaku
familycolor=Afro-Asiatic
states=Kenya
region=Laikipia District
speakers=50 (1983)
fam1=Afro-Asiatic
fam2=Cushitic
iso3=muu

Yaaku (also known as Mukogodo, Mogogodo, Mukoquodo, Siegu, Yaakua, Ndorobo) is an endangered Afro-Asiatic language spoken in Kenya. It is Cushitic, but its position within that family in unclear. Speakers are all older adults. [Raymond G. Gordon, Jr, ed. 2005. "Ethnologue: Languages of the World". 15th edition. Dallas: Summer Institute of Linguistics.]

Notes

References

* [http://www.ethnologue.com/show_language.asp?code=muu Ethnologue entry for Yaaku]
* Brenzinger, Matthias (1992) 'Lexical retention in language shift', in Brenzinger, Matthias (ed.) "Language Death: Factual and Theoretical Explorations with Special Reference to East Africa". Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 213–254.
* Heine, Bernd (1974/75) 'Notes on the Yaaku language (Kenya)', "Afrika und Übersee", 58(1), 27–61; 58(2), 119–138.
* Heine, Bernd & Brenzinger, Matthias (1988) 'Notes on the Mukogodo dialect of Maasai', "Afrikanistische Arbeitspapiere", 14, 97–131.
* Mous, Maarten & Stoks, Hans & Blonk, Matthijs (2005) 'De laatste sprekers' [the last speakers] , in "Indigo, tijdschrift over inheemse volken" [journal on indigenous peoples] , pp. 9–13.
* Sommer, Gabriele (1992) 'A survey on language death in Africa', in Brenzinger, Matthias (ed.) "Language Death: Factual and Theoretical Explorations with Special Reference to East Africa". Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 301–417.


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Yaaku — The Yiaku (often Yaaku , falsely Mukogodo Maasai ) are a people living in the Mukogodo forest west of Mount Kenya, a division of the Laikipia District of Rift Valley Province, Kenya. Former hunter gatherers and bee keepers, the Yaaku have partly… …   Wikipedia

  • Yaaku people — The Yiaku (often Yaaku, or incorrectly Mukogodo Maasai) are a people living in the Mukogodo forest west of Mount Kenya, a division of the Laikipia District of Rift Valley Province, Kenya. Former hunter gatherers and bee keepers, the Yaaku have… …   Wikipedia

  • Yaaku — ISO 639 3 Code : muu ISO 639 2/B Code : ISO 639 2/T Code : ISO 639 1 Code : Scope : Individual Language Type : Living …   Names of Languages ISO 639-3

  • Maasai language — Maasai ɔl Maa Spoken in Kenya, Tanzania Region Southern Kenya and Northern Tanzania Ethnicity Maasai people …   Wikipedia

  • List of languages by name — NOTOC This list of languages is alphabetical by English name of the language.Ethnologue lists about 7,300 main languages in its language name index (see the external link) and distinguishes about 39,491 alternate language names and… …   Wikipedia

  • Yiakus — Les Yiakus (parfois appelés Yaakus ou Mukogodo Masaï) est un peuple autochtone du Kenya, vivant dans la forêt Mukogodo à l Ouest du Mont Kenya. Un mouvement est apparu au début du XXIe siècle pour revitaliser le langage et les traditions… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Cushitic languages — Cushitic Geographic distribution: Horn of Africa Linguistic classification: Afroasiatic Cushitic Subdivisions: ? Beja (North) Agaw (Central) Sidamic (East Highlands) …   Wikipedia

  • Lowland East Cushitic languages — Infobox Language family name=Lowland East Cushitic region=Ethiopia familycolor=Afro Asiatic fam1=Afro Asiatic fam2=Cushitic child1=Saho Afar child2=Oromo child3=Omo Tana (perhaps not a single group) child4=? RiftThe Lowland East Cushitic… …   Wikipedia

  • Dorobo peoples — Dorobo (or Ndorobo, Wadorobo, Torobo) is a derogatory umbrella term for several unrelated hunter gatherer groups of Kenya and Tanzania. In the past 150 years, many of these peoples have assimilated to the pastoralist economy of neighbouring… …   Wikipedia

  • List of African languages — This is a list of African languages by classification.ClassificationAfro Asiatic languages*Berber languages **Eastern Berber languages ***Awjila Sokna languages ****Awjilah language ****Sawknah language ***Siwi language **Northern Berber… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.