New Zealand Pacific Party


New Zealand Pacific Party
New Zealand Pacific Party
Leader Taito Philip Field
Founded 2008
Dissolved 2010
Ideology Social conservatism, Christian democracy, communitarianism
Official colours Purple
MPs in the House of Representatives 0
Politics of New Zealand
Political parties
Elections

The New Zealand Pacific Party was a Christian political party that existed in New Zealand from 2008 to 2010. The party was founded as a vehicle for former Labour MP Taito Phillip Field, who was subsequently convicted for bribery and corruption.[1] It aimed to represent Pacific Island communities within New Zealand, and support Christian and "family values" and social justice.[2]

The party was registered on 24 April 2008,[3] and officially launched on 16 August 2008.[4] It claimed to have over 3000 members in August 2008.[5]

The Pacific Party lost its single constituency seat in New Zealand's Parliament when Taito Philip Field lost his Māngere electorate seat to Labour's Su'a William Sio. Field got 5,525 votes compared to Sio's 12,651 votes. In the party vote, the Pacific Party attracted 8640 votes, or 0.37 % of the total electorate vote in New Zealand.

After the 2008 general election, nothing further was heard from the Pacific Party for almost two years. On 2 September 2010 the party was deregistered.[6]

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • New Zealand Liberal Party — This article is about the original New Zealand Liberal Party. At least three subsequent organisations, unconnected to the original, have used the same name: the Liberal Party of 1962, Liberal Party of 1992, and the Liberal Party of 2008. The… …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand Reform Party — The Reform Party, formally the New Zealand Political Reform League, was New Zealand s second major political party, having been founded as a conservative response to the original Liberal Party. It was in government between 1912 and 1928, and… …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand Conservative Party — This article is about the minor party founded by Ross Meurant in 1994. For the later party led by Colin Craig, see Conservative Party of New Zealand. The Conservative label was also applied unofficially to the MPs who opposed the original Liberal …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand Representative Party — Proposed New Zealand Representative Party logo The New Zealand Representative Party was a political party in New Zealand. The party s leader was former ACT Party candidate Reg Turner.[1] The party claimed to have no policies, and to oppose… …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand Socialist Party — The New Zealand Socialist Party was founded in 1901, promoting the works of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. The group, despite being relatively moderate when compared with many other socialists, met with little tangible success, but it… …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand Patriot Party — The New Zealand Patriot Party was a small far right political party in New Zealand. It was founded by Sid Wilson, formerly the secretary and Auckland regional leader of the New Zealand National Front. Wilson failed to convince any other NZNF… …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand National Party — Rōpū Nāhinara Leader John Key Preside …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand Labour Party (1910) — New Zealand Labour Party Founded 1910 Dissolved 1912 Ideology Leftism Politics of New Zealand Political parties …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand Liberal Party (2008) — New Zealand Liberal Party logo The Liberal Party is a political party in New Zealand which promotes social liberalism. It was founded on 10 March 2008[1] The party is an attempt to revive the old New Zealand Liberal Party. It aims to be a broad… …   Wikipedia

  • New Zealand Republican Party (1995) — This article is about the 1995 2002 Republican Party. For the previous parties see New Zealand Republican Party (1967) and The Republic of New Zealand Party The New Zealand Republican Party of 1995 was a political party which campaigned for the… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.