Clifton, New Jersey

Clifton, New Jersey
—  City  —

Seal
Map of Clifton in Passaic County. Inset: Location of Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Clifton, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°52′4″N 74°9′16″W / 40.86778°N 74.15444°W / 40.86778; -74.15444Coordinates: 40°52′4″N 74°9′16″W / 40.86778°N 74.15444°W / 40.86778; -74.15444
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Passaic
Incorporated April 26, 1917
Government[1]
 - Type 1923 Municipal Manager Law
 - Mayor James Anzaldi (term ends 2014)[2]
 - Manager Albert Greco[3]
Area
 - Total 11.4 sq mi (29.5 km2)
 - Land 11.3 sq mi (29.3 km2)
 - Water 0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)
Elevation[4] 121 ft (37 m)
Population (2010 Census)[5][6]
 - Total 84,136
 - Density 7,380.4/sq mi (2,852.1/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07011-07015
Area code(s) 862/973
FIPS code 34-13690[7][8]
GNIS feature ID 0885188[9]
Website http://www.cliftonnj.org

Clifton is a city in Passaic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city had a total population of 84,136.[6] The 2010 population represented an increase of 5,464 residents (a gain of 6.9%) from its population of 78,672 in the 2000 Census, making it the state's 11th largest municipality.[5]

Clifton was incorporated as a city by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 26, 1917, replacing Acquackanonk Township, based on the results of a referendum held two days earlier.[10] Clifton is listed under five different zip codes (07011 Main Avenue, 07012 Allwood, 07013, 07014 Delawanna and 07015).[11]

Contents

Geography

Clifton is located at 40°52′04″N 74°09′16″W / 40.867899°N 74.154520°W / 40.867899; -74.154520 (40.867899, -74.154520).[12]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 11.4 square miles (30 km2), of which, 11.3 square miles (29 km2) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) of it (0.88%) is water.

Clifton is located 10 miles west of New York City off both Route 3 and Route 46. The city is also served by the Garden State Parkway, Route 19 and Route 21.

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1930 46,875
1940 48,827 4.2%
1950 64,511 32.1%
1960 82,084 27.2%
1970 82,437 0.4%
1980 74,388 −9.8%
1990 71,742 −3.6%
2000 78,672 9.7%
2010 84,136 6.9%
Population sources:
1930-1990[13] 2000[14] 2010[5][6]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 78,672 people, 30,244 households, and 20,354 families residing in the city. The population density was 6,965.2 people per square mile (2,688.1/km2). There were 31,060 housing units at an average density of 2,749.9 per square mile (1,061.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 66.22% White, 2.89% African American, 0.24% Native American, 6.44% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 9.60% from other races, and 4.57% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 19.84% of the population.[14]

There were 30,244 households out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.3% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.7% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.20.[14]

In the city the population was 21.6% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 30.7% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.1 males.[14]

The median income for a household in the city was $50,619, and the median income for a family was $60,688. Males had a median income of $40,143 versus $32,090 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,638. About 4.3% of families and 6.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.6% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.[14]

The largest ancestry groups in Clifton are Italian American (17%), Polish American (13%), Irish American (9%) and German American (8%).[15] Many Turkish, Albanian, and Ukrainian immigrants also live in Clifton. There are significant populations of Hispanics, Arabs, Filipinos, Chinese, and Indians as well.

Government

Local government

The city of Clifton is governed under the 1923 Municipal Manager Law. The government consists of a City Council comprising seven council members, with all positions elected at large in nonpartisan elections to four-terms of office on a concurrent basis.[1]

As of 2011, the Mayor of Clifton is James Anzaldi. Members of the City Council are Peter C. Eagler, Matthew Grabowski, Steven Hatala, Jr., Joseph C. Kolodziej, Mary Sadrakula and Matthew J. Ward .[3]

Federal, state and county representation

Clifton is in the 8th Congressional district and is part of New Jersey's 34th state legislative district.[16] The legislative district was kept unchanged by the New Jersey Apportionment Commission based on the results of the 2010 Census.[6]

New Jersey's Eighth Congressional District is represented by Bill Pascrell (D, Paterson). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Frank Lautenberg (D, Cliffside Park) and Bob Menendez (D, Hoboken).

34th District of the New Jersey Legislature, which is represented in the New Jersey Senate by Nia Gill (D, Montclair) and in the New Jersey General Assembly by Thomas P. Giblin (D, Montclair) and Sheila Y. Oliver (D, East Orange).[17] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham).[18] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[19]

Passaic County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected to staggered three-year terms office on an at-large basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[20] As of 2011, Passaic County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce James (D, term ends December 31, 2011; Clifton), Freeholder Deputy Director Pat Lepore (D, 2013; Woodland Park), Deborah E. Ciambrone (R, 2012; Wayne), Terry Duffy (D, 2013; West Milford), Greyson P. Hannigan (D, 2011; Paterson), Michael Marrotta (R, 2012; Wayne) and Edward O'Connell (R, 2012; Wanaque).[21]

Emergency services

Fire

Education

The Clifton Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2009-10 school year, the district's 17 schools had an enrollment of 10,852 students and 778 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.95.[22] Schools in the district are 14 elementary schools serving grades K-5, Christopher Columbus Middle School (1,161 students) and Woodrow Wilson Middle School (1,308) for grades 6-8, along with Clifton High School (3,336) for grades 9-12.[23]

Clifton High School's Marching Band, "The Showband of the Northeast", is well-known internationally.

With over 3,300 students enrolled at Clifton High School, it is the largest single facility high school in New Jersey; Elizabeth High School has more students, but they are spread over multiple campuses.[24] An additional site for roughly 500 incoming freshmen has been built and labeled "Clifton High School Annex" and was constructed at a cost of $17 million. This was initially met with strict opposition but opened in September 2009 to about 500 incoming Freshman to alleviate overcrowding.[25]

Popular culture references

  • The character of Rupert Pupkin in Martin Scorsese's film The King of Comedy comes from Clifton.[26]
  • The movie Donnie Brasco, which starred Johnny Depp and Al Pacino, was filmed partially in Clifton in 1996.[27]
  • Many scenes from The Sopranos were filmed in town, including the parking lot of the Valley Regency on Valley Road, Main Memorial Park, and Clifton High School. The golf scenes were filmed at the Upper Montclair Country Club.
  • New York Yankee Hall of Famers Yogi Berra and Phil Rizzuto owned a bowling alley in Clifton called "Rizzuto-Berra Bowling Lanes."[28] The alley, later known as Astro Bowl, was located in the Styertowne Shopping Center in the Allwood section of town and remained open until 1999.
  • The Upper Montclair Country Club was home to the NFL Golf Classic. The Sybase Classic golf tournament is held there ever year.[29]
  • Baseball Hall of Famer Honus Wagner played his last two seasons (1896–97) of minor league baseball for the Paterson Silk Sox. While the team was named Paterson, their stadium was within the Clifton city limits. Doherty Field was located off of Main Avenue behind the Doherty Silk Mill.
  • An abandoned sewerage system, known as the "Gates Of Hell" is located in Clifton. Upon reaching a certain depth in the sewer, it becomes so dark that it is impossible to see anything, including shadows. Adventurers wander in with video cameras, and some upload them to YouTube. The walls are full of vandalism and various artworks. "The Gates of Hell" were featured in Weird New Jersey.[30]

Commerce

  • The now defunct Linens 'n Things, bedding and home furnishings retailer, was headquartered in Clifton.
  • Clifton Commons, a shopping center located near Route 3, featuring several stores and a 16-screen AMC theater
  • Promenade Shops at Clifton is a new upscale mall located on Route 3 West.
  • The Hot Grill, a popular hot dog restaurant located on Lexington Avenue.
  • Rutt's Hut, another popular hot dog restaurant is located at the east end of Delawana Avenue.
  • The Hearth, a popular char-grill restaurant is located on Route 46 West.
  • The Tick-Tock Diner, a popular diner located on Route 3 West.
  • Trains at the Clifton station and Delawanna station follow the New Jersey Transit Main Line to Suffern and Hoboken.

Notable natives and residents

References

  1. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2006, p. 165.
  2. ^ 2011 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  3. ^ a b City Council, City of Clifton. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  4. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: City of Clifton, Geographic Names Information System, accessed November 12, 2007.
  5. ^ a b c "The Counties and Most Populous Cities and Townships in 2010 in New Jersey: 2000 and 2010". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-03. http://2010.census.gov/news/xls/st34-final_newjersey.xls. Retrieved 2011-11-07. 
  6. ^ a b c d 2011 Apportionment Redistricting: Municipalities sorted alphabetically, New Jersey Department of State, p. 2. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  7. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  8. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 14, 2008.
  9. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  10. ^ "The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968", John P. Snyder, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 209.
  11. ^ About New Jersey: Zip Codes, State of New Jersey, backed up by the Internet Archive as of October 20, 2007. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  12. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  13. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed July 6, 2011.
  14. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Demographic Profile Highlights: Clifton city, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  15. ^ Clifton, NJ Ancestry & Family History, EPodunk, accessed April 21, 2007.
  16. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, New Jersey League of Women Voters, p. 56. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  17. ^ "Legislative Roster: 2010-2011 Session". New Jersey Legislature. http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/members/roster.asp. Retrieved 2010-02-08. 
  18. ^ "About the Governor". New Jersey. http://www.nj.gov/governor/about/. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  19. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". New Jersey. http://www.nj.gov/governor/lt/. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  20. ^ The Role of The Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2011.
  21. ^ 2010 Passaic County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2011.
  22. ^ District information for the Clifton School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  23. ^ Index of Schools, Clifton Public Schools. Accessed July 19, 2011.
  24. ^ Clifton High's hallway gridlock, The Record (Bergen County), December 6, 2006. Accessed August 26, 2007. "Clifton High School, circa 1962, is the largest single high school in the state. Only Elizabeth High School has more students, but they are spread out over five campuses."
  25. ^ Gicas, Tony. "Clifton High annex nearly ready", The Record (Bergen County), July 14, 2009. Accessed July 19, 2011. "The Clifton High School annex building, a lightning rod for controversy since its approval in 2004, is complete and almost ready to be occupied. But who will attend classes in the new building in September, and under what criteria, has yet to be decided. The $17 million school at 290 Brighton Road, in the renovated former Mayer Textile building, will hold about 540 of the total 850 freshmen expected to be enrolled for classes in September."
  26. ^ King Of Comedy Script - Dialogue Transcript, accessed December 1, 2006.
  27. ^ Beckerman, Jim. "ALL THE WORLD'S A SET: MOVIE MANIA HITS N.J.", The Record (Bergen County), May 18, 1996. Accessed December 10, 2008.
  28. ^ Pezzano, Chuck. "Rizzuto enjoyed a big role in bowling; Sport attractive to baseball figures.", The Record (Bergen County), August 20, 2007. "Rizzuto-Berra Bowling Lanes in Clifton, originally owned by Rizzuto and fellow icon Yogi Berra, was a favorite bowling spot for more than 40 years before giving way to a bank of shopping center stores."
  29. ^ http://www.sybaseclassic.com/folders.asp?action=display&record=1
  30. ^ Gates of Hell, accessed June 12, 2010.
  31. ^ Bank, Irving A. "Orange embraces Alford, its NY Giant", The Star-Ledger, February 10, 2008. Accessed February 4, 2011. "Hope now takes the form of turkey sandwiches and strawberry-frosted doughnuts -- and whenever Alford makes the quick drive down the Parkway from his home in Clifton for some of his grandmother's home cooking."
  32. ^ DeCaro, Frank. "No Longer the Punch-Line State; Lauryn Hill, the Sopranos and others are unapologetic New Jerseyans.", The New York Times, April 4, 1999."Growing up in Clifton and North Caldwell, Mr. Chase said, New Jersey seemed very exciting and very mysterious, not dull and predictable as many New Yorkers like to believe."
  33. ^ Dow Henry Drukker, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed July 16, 2007.
  34. ^ DJ Profiles: Hector Fonseca, noizemag.com.
  35. ^ "Clifton's Karcz joining Red Bulls", The Record (Bergen County), July 3, 2007. Accessed July 28, 2007. "Clifton native Chris Karcz, who played at Rutgers, has been signed by the Red Bulls.... The midfielder/forward was a three-time All-Big East Conference selection at Rutgers and was a first-team All-American in his senior year at Clifton High School."
  36. ^ Ratish, Robert. "PHARMACY GRADUATE PLEDGES $5M SHOT IN ARM FOR RUTGERS -- SCHOOL TO BE RENAMED FOR FORMER CLIFTON MAN, The Record (Bergen County), December 16, 2001. Accessed May 13, 2007.
  37. ^ Spiewak, Anna. "Convenience, location make Clifton the right spot", The Record (Bergen County), January 6, 2008. Accessed May 28, 2008. "Several personalities also hail from Clifton, including psychologist and author of numerous works on cognitive behavior therapy Michael Adams, Italian-American soccer player Giuseppe Rossi, former New York Jets lineman Dave Szott, movie director Ronald F. Maxwell and David Chase, creator of The Sopranos."
  38. ^ Chris Opperman: Present-Day Composer, Oppymusic.com 4.2. Accessed July 23, 2007. "Pianist/composer Chris Opperman grew up in Clifton, New Jersey and attended Berklee."
  39. ^ Honan, William H. "Morris Pashman, 87, Champion of Free Speech on New Jersey's Highest Court", The New York Times, October 10, 1999. Accessed October 19, 2009.
  40. ^ Norman M. Robertson, New Jersey Legislature, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 22, 1998. Accessed May 29, 2010.
  41. ^ My Country, 'Tis of Thee, ESPN, November 30, 2005. "Flying under the radar of most is 18-year-old Giuseppe Rossi, a striker born in New Jersey, whose parents are from Italy. Rossi was brought up in the soccer hotbed of Clifton, N.J., where his father coached soccer."
  42. ^ Richardson, Kara L. "NJ actor eager to share WWII hero's story", Daily Record (Morristown), September 18, 2007. Accessed February 4, 2011. "Seda, who grew up in Clifton and now lives in the Los Angeles area with his family, is on a break from filming The Pacific, a 10-hour HBO miniseries.
  43. ^ Martino, Andy. "Police: Driver isn't gunman in Giants' Steve Smith robbery", Daily News (New York), December 3, 2008. Accessed February 4, 2011. "At about 4 a.m. on Nov. 25, Smith was returning to his home in Clifton, N.J., when a man accosted him in front of his house, according to Detective Captain Robert Rowan of the Clifton Police Department."
  44. ^ Szott tears ACL in non-contact drill, New York Jets press release dated May 29, 2002.
  45. ^ 15-Year NFL Veteran Dave Szott Joins Local Advisory Board, press release dated October 8, 2004.
  46. ^ Pedulla, Tom. "Tynes never lost confidence in his kicking or his family", USA Today, January 29, 2008. Accessed February 7, 2008. "Tynes' wife, watching by herself at their Clifton, N.J., home after putting the twins to bed, held a muted celebration."
  47. ^ Theodore, Jeff (August 4, 2008). "Keeping tabs on Jersey's 'Evil'". The Jersey Journal. 
  48. ^ Jacobs, Andrew. "A Caped Crusader For Peace (and Fun); Rich and Famous for His Fame, He's Shooting for Techno Stardom", The New York Times, October 9, 2004. Accessed October 16, 2011. "As a child growing up in Clifton, N.J., Ivan was often encouraged by both parents to sing impromptu renditions of Moon River in hotel lobbies."
  49. ^ Assemblyman Gerald H. Zecker, New Jersey Legislature, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 25, 1998. Accessed June 14, 2010.

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