Mark Wilson's Complete Course In Magic

Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic  
Mark wilsons complete course in magic.png
Cover of 1988 edition.
Author(s) Mark Wilson
Illustrator Julia Laughlin; Manny Katz
Cover artist Weaver Lilly; Tony Schmidt
Country USA
Language English
Subject(s) Magic (illusion)
Genre(s) Non-fiction
Publisher Courage Books: Running Press Book Publishers
Publication date 1988
Pages 472 pages
ISBN 0-89471-623-9
OCLC Number 17805952
Dewey Decimal 793.8 19
LC Classification GV1547 .W763 1988
Preceded by 1975, 1981 editions
Followed by 2003 edition

Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic is the title of a book on magic written by Mark Wilson, the stage magician.[1][2] The book is a popular reference for magicians and has been in print since its first issue in 1975.

Contents

Description of Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic

This description is based on the 1988 edition.

The book is organized into sections; each devoted to a particular topic, as follows:

Introductory sections

  • Table of Contents
    • Listing of all sections and effects with page numbers.
    • This volume contains no index.
  • Dedication
  • Introductory Letter
    • Mark Wilson addresses his reader as "Dear Student," and expounds on his views of the basics of performance magic.
    • Throughout, Wilson refers to illusions as "tricks."

Biographies

  • Mark Wilson
  • Walter Gibson, co-author
  • U.F. "Gen" Grant, co-author
  • Larry Anderson, co-author
  • Rakesh Menon, Budding Magician

Practice Makes Perfect

"Three rules are often given as the key to attaining perfection in any art. They are: Practice, more Practice, and still more Practice." (p. 15)

Misdirection

Wilson's exposition on the basics of misdirection.

Acknowledgements and Credits

Illusions (Tricks)

The main body of the book comprises tricks (Wilson's term) and prerequisite techniques and skills required to perform them. The key elements are illustrated with line drawings and explained in detail in the accompanying text.

Each trick is divided into logical sub-sections:

  • Effect
    • What the audience is intended to see
  • Secret and Preparation
    • Setting up the props, and how they work.
  • Method
    • How the performer achieves the effect, step by step.
  • Comments and Suggestions
    • Tips, pointers, and hard-won experience from the authors.

Card Magic

The section on card effects is divided into classes of tricks; each class contains multiple individual techniques and tricks, as follows:

  • Card Magic
  • Self-Working Card Tricks
  • The Hindu Shuffle
  • Overhand Shuffle
  • Forcing A Card
  • The Double Lift
  • The Glide
  • Double-Backed Card
  • Double-Faced Card
  • The Short Card
  • Giant Cards
  • Special Card Tricks
  • Flourishes
  • Genii Cards





Money Magic

As with Card Magic, the section on money effects is divided into classes of tricks; each class comprises multiple individual techniques and tricks, as follows:

  • Money Magic
  • Money Magic — Bills

Rope Magic

The section on rope effects is not divided, but comprises multiple individual techniques and tricks.

Silk & Handkerchief Magic

This section comprises multiple individual techniques and tricks.

Impromptu Magic

This section comprises multiple individual techniques and tricks, mainly with household objects readily at hand.

Mental Magic

This section comprises multiple individual techniques and tricks.

Betchas

This section comprises multiple individual techniques and tricks of the kind which the magician might bet he can do something the spectator cannot: "I'll bet you."

Make At Home Magic

This section comprises multiple individual techniques and tricks, requiring apparatus which can be constructed as build-it-yourself projects.

Sponge Ball Magic

This section comprises multiple individual techniques and tricks, requiring compressible balls as props.

Billiard Ball Magic

This section comprises multiple individual techniques and tricks with incompressible balls.

Cups & Balls

Perhaps the first illusions performed; definitely the first recorded in writing (in ancient Egypt). This section comprises multiple individual techniques and tricks.

Magical Illusions

"In magical terms an "Illusion" is any trick or effect involving a human being." (p. 435) This section comprises multiple individual illusions, according to the quoted definition.

Your Future In Magic

Wilson and co-authors' parting words of encouragement to their readers and students.

References

  1. ^ Wilson, Mark (1975). Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic. Courage Books. ISBN 0894716239. 
  2. ^ Wilson, Mark (2003) [1975]. Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic (Paperback ed.). Running Press Books. ISBN 978-0762414550. 

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