Antimicrobial pharmacodynamics

Antimicrobial pharmacodynamics is a term used to describe the relationship between concentration of antibiotic and its ability to inhibit vital processes of endo- or ectoparasites and microbial organisms.C.H. Nightingale, T. Murakawa, P.G. Ambrose (2002) Antimicrobial Pharmacodynamics in Theory and Clinical Practice Informa Health Care ISBN 0824705610] This branch of pharmacodynamics relates concentration of an anti-infective agent to effect, but specifically to its antimicrobial effect.cite journal |author=Drusano GL |title=Antimicrobial pharmacodynamics: critical interactions of 'bug and drug' |journal=Nat. Rev. Microbiol. |volume=2 |issue=4 |pages=289–300 |year=2004 |pmid=15031728 |doi=10.1038/nrmicro862]

Concentration-dependent effects

The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration are used to measure "in vitro" activity antimicrobial and is an excellent indicator of antimicrobial potency. They don't give any information relating to time-dependent antimicrobial killing the so called post antibiotic effect.

References


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