Representative direct democracy

Representative direct democracy is a combination of direct democracy and representative democracy. In representative direct democracy there are representatives that vote on behalf of the citizen, as long as they do not choose to vote themselves. In other words, it works just the same as a representative democracy, as long as citizens do not explicitly override their politicians.

Representative direct democracy requires more sophisticated voting procedures than those employed in a purely representative democracy. In practice it would likely require some form of electronic voting system that would automatically administer the votes of politicians, and the overriding votes of citizen. Similarly, the total number of votes in such a system would have to be determined on the basis of the entire population, rather than just the number of representatives, i.e., representatives would hold a number of votes that exactly corresponds to the size of their constituency.

A number of organizations for direct democracy have adopted this idea, and employ it in their own voting systems.

The overriding intent of representative direct democracy is to avoid some of the criticisms levelled against pure direct democracy, particularly, that citizens lack the time required to participate in a pure direct democracy. In a representative direct democracy, citizens are granted the opportunity to directly participate in public decision-making, while maintaining the benefit of elected representatives that ensure sufficient amounts of indirect participation.

External links

* [http://www.freegovernment.org FreeGovernment.org]
* [http://www.world-wide-democracy.net Worldwide Direct Democracy Movement]
* [http://ni4d.us NationalInitiative.us]
* [http://demoex.net/eng DemoEx]
* [http://www.aktivdemokrati.se AktivDemokrati]
* [http://www.direktdemokraterna.org Direktdemokraterna] - Swedish representative direct democracy party


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Direct Democracy Party of New Zealand — Founded 2005 Dissolved 30 June 2009 …   Wikipedia

  • Direct democracy — Part of the Politics series Democracy History · Vari …   Wikipedia

  • direct democracy —    Popular self government, characterised by the direct and continuous participation of citizens in the running of government and the taking of decisions. Direct democracy as practised in Ancient Greece involved all the citizens coming together… …   Glossary of UK Government and Politics

  • direct democracy — /dərɛkt dəˈmɒkrəsi/ (say duhrekt duh mokruhsee) noun a form of democracy in which issues are decided by a direct vote of all the members of the community (opposed to representative democracy) …   Australian English dictionary

  • History of direct democracy in the United States — The history of direct democracy amongst non Native Americans in the United States dates from the 1630s in the New England Colonies.[citation needed] Some New England town meetings still carry on that tradition. Contents 1 Progressive Era 2 …   Wikipedia

  • Direct representation — Direct representation[1] or proxy representation[2] is a proposed form of representative democracy where each representative s vote is weighted in proportion to the number of citizens who have chosen that candidate to represent them. This is in… …   Wikipedia

  • Democracy Index — 2010. Full democracies:   9 10 …   Wikipedia

  • Democracy House Project — is a non profit organization founded by Professor Jeffrey Nielsen of Westminster College, Salt Lake City and Utah Valley University, Orem, Utah. The Project is an educational initiative using his peer based model to teach political literacy in… …   Wikipedia

  • Democracy — For other uses, see Democracy (disambiguation) and Democratic Party (disambiguation). A woman casts her vote in the second round of the French presidential election of 2007 …   Wikipedia

  • democracy — /di mok reuh see/, n., pl. democracies. 1. government by the people; a form of government in which the supreme power is vested in the people and exercised directly by them or by their elected agents under a free electoral system. 2. a state… …   Universalium


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.