Mannes College The New School for Music

Mannes College The New School For Music
Established 1916[1]
Type Private
President David E. Van Zandt
Students 1,135[1]
Location New York City, New York, United States
40°47′11″N 73°58′27″W / 40.786407°N 73.974123°W / 40.786407; -73.974123Coordinates: 40°47′11″N 73°58′27″W / 40.786407°N 73.974123°W / 40.786407; -73.974123
Campus Urban
Colors New School Yellow, Orange, and Red                  
Website http://www.newschool.edu/mannes

Mannes College The New School for Music (play /ˈmænɨs/) is The New School university's music conservatory. While the university's main campus is located in Greenwich Village, New York City, Mannes maintains its main academic building on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

Contents

History

Mannes College The New School for Music.

Originally called The David Mannes Music School, it was founded in 1916 by David Mannes, concertmaster of the New York Symphony Orchestra and Clara Damrosch, sister of Walter Damrosch, then conductor of that orchestra. Originally housed on East 70th Street (later occupied by the Dalcroze School), the campus was created out of three brownstones on East 74th St, in Manhattan's Upper East Side. After 1938, the school was known as the Mannes Music School (possibly in conjunction with the retirement of David and Clara Mannes from active teaching). In 1953 Mannes began offering degrees and changed its name to the Mannes College of Music. It later merged with the Chatham Square Music School. In 1984 the school moved to its current home on West 85th Street. In 1989 Mannes joined The New School, comprising eight schools (including Parsons School of Design, Eugene Lang College, and the New School for Drama). In 2005 Mannes changed its name to Mannes College the New School for Music.

Techniques of Music

The Techniques of Music program is the foundation for academic musical study at Mannes, encompassing the range of elementary to advanced music theory and aural skills classes.

Though music theory was taught at Mannes from its inception, a major turning point occurred in 1931 with the hiring of Hans Weisse, one of the leading students of Heinrich Schenker.[2] Over the following nine years, Weisse promoted not just the study of Schenkerian Analysis but began to incorporate it into the musical life of the school, including performance and composition. Because of his association with the school, Schenker's publication Five Graphic Music Analyses (Fünf Urlinie-Tafeln) was published jointly by his regular publisher, Universal-Edition and the David Mannes School in 1932.[3]

In 1940, Weisse died unexpectedly and was replaced by Felix Salzer. Salzer, also a student of Schenker, built upon Weisse's foundation by reorganizing the theory program into the Techniques of Music department. The philosophy behind this move was and is to integrate musicianship, theory, and performance - which was based on Schenker's concept of the role of theory in music.[4] Salzer's leading student, Carl Schachter, as well as his students, continued and strengthened the department.

Notable faculty

For a complete list of notable New School faculty, see List of The New School people.

Notable alumni

For a complete list of notable New School alumni, see List of The New School people.

References

  1. ^ a b http://www.newschool.edu/mannes/subpage.aspx?id=2760
  2. ^ Historical information is derived from annual Mannes catalogs.
  3. ^ As indicated on the cover of the publication's first edition.
  4. ^ See David Carson Berry, "Hans Weisse and the Dawn of American Schenkerism," Journal of Musicology 20, no. 1 (Winter 2003): 104-156.

See also

Related Topics

External links


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts — Infobox University name = Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts native name = latin name = motto = established = 1985 type = Private endowment = staff = faculty = 115 [cite web|url=http://www.newschool.edu/admin/oir/factbook2006.pdf|… …   Wikipedia

  • The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music — Established 1986 Type Private President David E. Van Zandt …   Wikipedia

  • The New School for Drama — Established 2005 Type Graduate Director Pippin Parker …   Wikipedia

  • Milano The New School for Management and Urban Policy — Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy is a college at The New School within The New School for Public Engagement that teaches Nonprofit Management, Organizational Change Management, Urban Policy, and International… …   Wikipedia

  • Parsons The New School for Design — Coordinates: 40°44′07″N 73°59′39″W / 40.73528°N 73.99417°W / 40.73528; 73.99417 …   Wikipedia

  • The New School — This is about the university in New York City; for other uses, see New School (disambiguation). The New School Motto To the Living Spirit (unofficial)[1] …   Wikipedia

  • College or university school of music — A university school of music or college of music, or academy of music or conservatoire (French, but used in British English) mdash; also known as a conservatory (American English) or a conservatorium (Australian English) mdash; is a higher… …   Wikipedia

  • New School University — formerly New School for Social Research Private university in New York City. It was established in 1919 as an informal centre for adult education and soon became the first American university to specialize in continuing education. In 1934 it… …   Universalium

  • Bloomingdale School of Music — (BSM) is a nonprofit community music school on the Upper West Side of New York City. It is housed in a five story, 102 year old brownstone and was founded in 1964 by David D. Greer, organist and choirmaster of the West End Presbyterian Church.… …   Wikipedia

  • Music schools in the United States — In the United States, there are four types of music schools. Three of them follow the more traditional formats of music education. The last one is more informal and includes schools that teach the history and performance of world music. Contents… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.