Mito Line


Mito Line
     Mito Line
水戸線

E501 series EMU between Kasama and Shishido stations
Overview
Type Heavy rail
Locale Tochigi, Ibaraki prefectures
Termini Oyama
Tomobe
Stations 16
Operation
Opened 1889
Operator(s) JR East
Technical
Line length 50.2 km (31.19 mi)
Track gauge 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)
Electrification 1,500 V DC overhead catenary

The Mito Line (水戸線 Mito-sen?) is a railway line between Oyama Station in Tochigi Prefecture and Tomobe Station in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. The line is 50.2 km (31.2 mi) long and is owned and operated by the East Japan Railway Company (JR East).

Contents

Station list

  • All trains stop at every station.
  • Trains can pass one another at stations marked "◇" and "∨" and cannot pass at stations marked "|".
Station Japanese Distance (km) Transfers   Location
Between
stations
Total
Oyama 小山 - 0.0 Tōhoku Shinkansen, Tōhoku Main Line (Utsunomiya Line), Ryōmō Line Oyama Tochigi
Otabayashi 小田林 4.9 4.9   Yūki Ibaraki
Yūki 結城 1.7 6.6  
Higashi-Yūki 東結城 1.7 8.3  
Kawashima 川島 2.1 10.4   Chikusei
Tamado 玉戸 2.1 12.5  
Shimodate 下館 3.7 16.2 Mooka Railway Mooka Line
Jōsō Line
Niihari 新治 6.1 22.3  
Yamato 大和 3.6 25.9   Sakuragawa
Iwase 岩瀬 3.7 29.6  
Haguro 羽黒 3.2 32.8  
Fukuhara 福原 4.2 37.0   Kasama
Inada 稲田 3.1 40.1  
Kasama 笠間 3.2 43.3  
Shishido 宍戸 5.2 48.5  
Tomobe 友部 1.7 50.2 Jōban Line (some through services for Mito)

History

  • 16 January 1889: Mito Railway, a private railway company opened its line between Oyama and Mito Stations.
  • 1 March 1892: Nippon Railway annexed Mito Railway.
  • 1 July 1895: Tomobe Station opened; Joban Line connected with former Mito Railway line.
  • 1 November 1906: With Railway Nationalisation Act, Japanese Government Railways (JGR) nationalised Nippon Railway.
  • 12 October 1909: JGR renamed the line as the "Mito Line" for the section between Oyama and Tomobe, with Tomobe to Mito forming part of the Joban Line.
  • 1 February 1967: Electrification completed.

Rolling stock

  • 415 series EMUs
  • E501 series EMUs

References

External links

Media related to Mito Line at Wikimedia Commons


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