Long-tailed Hopping Mouse

Long-tailed hopping mouse[1]
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Family: Muridae
Genus: Notomys
Species: N. longicaudatus
Binomial name
Notomys longicaudatus
(Gould, 1844)

The long-tailed hopping mouse (Notomys longicaudatus) is an extinct species of rodent in the family Muridae. It was found only in Australia. It is known from a handful of specimens,[2] the last of which was collected in 1901[1][3] or possibly 1902.[2][4] It is presumed to have become extinct within a few decades from then[4] – possibly several decades in view of a skull fragment found in an owl pellet in 1977.[3] The cause of extinction is unknown[2] but may be a variety of factors including predation and habitat alteration. Little is known of its biology[3] other than that it dug burrows in stiff clay soils.[3] It was less a pest to humans than other hopping mice,[3] although it would eat raisins.[3] The long-tailed hopping mouse was mainly gray in colour with small pink ears and big eyes with long hairy pink tail about two inches longer than its own body.[citation needed] It was first described by John Gould on the basis of specimens sent to him from Australia.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b Musser, Guy G.; Carleton, Michael D. (16 November 2005). "Notomys longicaudatus". In Wilson, Don E., and Reeder, DeeAnn M., eds. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2 vols. (2142 pp.). ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. http://www.bucknell.edu/msw3/browse.asp?id=13001624. 
  2. ^ a b c d Morris, K. & Burbidge, A. (2008). Notomys longicaudatus. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 6 January 2009.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Long-tailed Hopping-mouse (Notomys longicaudatus)". The Rainforest Information Centre. http://www.rainforestinfo.org.au/spp/Schouten/long.htm. Retrieved 2011-04-17. 
  4. ^ a b Pavey, Chris (May 2006). "Notomys longicaudatus" (PDF). Department of Natural Resources, Environment and the Arts, Northern Territory Government. http://www.nt.gov.au/nreta/wildlife/animals/threatened/pdf/mammals/longtailed_hoppingmouse_ex.pdf. Retrieved 2011-04-17. 
  5. ^ Gould, John (1844). "Exhibition and character of a number of animals, &c. transmitted from Australia by Mr. Gilbert". Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, 1844: 104.



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