List of tallest buildings in Pittsburgh


List of tallest buildings in Pittsburgh

This list of tallest buildings in Pittsburgh ranks skyscrapers in the U.S. city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania by height. The tallest building in Pittsburgh is the 64-story U.S. Steel Tower, which rises convert|841|ft|m|0 and was completed in 1970.Cite web|title=U.S. Steel Tower|url=http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=usouthsteeltower-pittsburgh-pa-usa|publisher=Emporis.com|accessdate=2007-12-25] It also stands as the fourth-tallest building in Pennsylvania and the 35th-tallest building in the United States. The second-tallest skyscraper in the city is One Mellon Center, which rises convert|725|ft|m|0.Cite web|title=One Mellon Center|url=http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=1melloncenter-pittsburgh-pa-usa|publisher=Emporis.com|accessdate=2007-12-25] Eleven of the twenty tallest buildings in Pennsylvania are located in Pittsburgh.

The history of skyscrapers in Pittsburgh began with the 1895 completion of the Carnegie Building; this structure, rising 13 floors, was the first steel-framed skyscraper to be constructed in the city. [cite web|url=http://www.wqed.org/education/pghist/units/WPAhist/wpa5.shtml|title=Steel City - Manufacturing Metropolis: 1876-1945|accessdate=2008-04-05|publisher=WQED Pittsburgh|work=Pittsburgh History Series] [cite web|url=http://pubpages.unh.edu/~jrl8/history.html|title=History of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania|accessdate=2008-04-05] It never held the title of tallest structure in the city, however, as it did not surpass the convert|249|ft|m|0|adj=on tower of the Allegheny County Courthouse, which was completed in 1888.cite web|url=http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?buildingID=19041|title=Allegheny County Courthouse & Jail|accessdate=2008-04-05|publisher=SkyscraperPage.com] The Carnegie Building was later demolished in 1952 to make way for an expansion of a Macy's department store. [cite web|url=http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=carnegiebuilding-pittsburgh-pa-usa|title=Carnegie Building|accessdate=2008-04-05|publisher=Emporis.com] Pittsburgh experienced a large building boom from the late 1960s to the late 1980s. During this time, 12 of the city's 21 tallest building were constructed, inculding the city's three tallest structures, the U.S. Steel Tower, One Mellon Center, and PPG Place. The city is the site of 9 completed skyscrapers over convert|500|ft|m|0 in height, of which two rank among the tallest in the United States. Overall, Pittsburgh's skyline is ranked (based on existing and under-construction buildings over convert|500|ft|m|0 tall) second in Pennsylvania (after Philadelphia), fourth in the Northeast (after New York City, Boston and Philadelphia) and 13th in the United States.ref label|note01|A|^ As of April 2008, there are 149 completed high-rises in the city.cite web|url=http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/ci/bu/sk/?id=101313|title=High-rise Buildings of Pittsburgh|accessdate=2008-04-05|publisher=Emporis.com]

Unlike many other large American cities, Pittsburgh has been the site of very few high-rise construction projects over the past two decades. The most recently completed skyscraper in the city is Fifth Avenue Place, which was constructed in 1988. Three PNC Plaza, which is planned to rise convert|344|ft|m|0 in height, is the only major new skyscraper development taking place in the city. As of April 2008, there are five high-rises under construction, approved for construction, and proposed for construction in Pittsburgh, as well as two renovation projects.

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Tallest buildings

This lists ranks Pittsburgh skyscrapers that stand at least convert|300|ft|m|0 tall, based on standard height measurement. This includes spires and architectural details but does not include antenna masts. Existing structures are included for ranking purposes based on present height.

ee also

* Architecture of Pittsburgh

Notes

:A. note label|note01|A|^New York has 206 existing and under construction buildings over 500 ft (152 m), Chicago has 107, Miami has 37, Houston has 30, Los Angeles has 22, Dallas has 19, Atlanta has 19, San Francisco has 18, Las Vegas has 17, Boston has 16, Seattle has 12, Philadelphia has 10 and Pittsburgh has nine. Pittsburgh is tied with Jersey City as the 13th largest skyline in the United States. Source of skyline ranking information: SkyscraperPage.com: [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=8 New York] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=4 Chicago] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=134 Miami] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=28 Houston] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=26 Los Angeles] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=92 Dallas] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=36 Atlanta] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=114 San Francisco] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=163 Las Vegas] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=145 Boston] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=27 Seattle] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=326 Philadelphia] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=327 Pittsburgh] , [http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?cityID=158 Jersey City] .:B. note label|note02|B|^This building was demolished in 1997 due to lack of tenants. [Cite web |title=Farmers Bank Building |url=http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=farmersbankbuilding-pittsburgh-pa-usa |accessdate=2008-04-07 |publisher=Emporis.com] :C. note label|note03|C|^This building was demolished in 1970 to make room for One PNC Plaza. [Cite web |title=First National Bank Building |url=http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=1nationalbankbuilding-pittsburgh-pa-usa |accessdate=2008-04-07 |publisher=Emporis.com]

References

;General
* [http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/ci/bu/sk/li/?id=101313&bt=2&ht=2&sro=1 Emporis.com - Pittsburgh] ;Specific

External links

* [http://skyscraperpage.com/diagrams/?c327 Diagram of Pittsburgh skyscrapers] on SkyscraperPage


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