Mexica


Mexica
Mexica
Aztec drums, Florentine Codex..jpg
Music and dance during a One Flower ceremony, from the Florentine Codex.
Regions with significant populations
Tenochtitlan
Tlatelolco
Languages

Nahuatl

Religion

Aztec religion
Catholicism (after the Conquest)

Related ethnic groups

Other Nahua peoples

The Mexica (Nahuatl: Mēxihcah, pronounced [meːˈʃiʔkaʔ]; the singular is Mēxihcatl) or Mexicas — called Aztecs in occidental historiography, although this term is not limited to the Mexica — were an indigenous people of the Valley of Mexico, known today as the rulers of the Aztec empire. The Mexica were a Nahua people who founded their two cities Tenochtitlan and Tlatelolco on raised islets in Lake Texcoco around AD 1200. After the rise of the Tenochca Mexica they came to dominate the other Mexica city-state Tlatelolco.

The Mexica are eponymous of the placename Mexico (Mēxihco).[1] This refers to the interconnected settlements in the valley which became the site of what is now Mexico City, which held natural, geographical, and population advantages as the metropolitan center of the region of the future Mexican state, which was expanded upon in the wake of the Spanish conquest and administered from the former Aztec capital as New Spain.

The seven caves of Chicomoztoc, as depicted in the Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca.

Like many of the peoples around them, the Mexica spoke Nahuatl. The form of Nahuatl used in the 16th century, when it began to be written in the alphabet brought by the Spanish, is known as Classical Nahuatl. Nahuatl is still spoken today by over 1.5 million people.

Huitzilopochtli, the patron god of the Mexica, as depicted in the Codex Telleriano-Remensis.

Notes

  1. ^ Andrews (2003): p. 500.

The Mexica people consisted of the Olmec, Toltec, and Aztec people. The empire began in 1430 and were conquered and captured by 1521.

References

  • Andrews, J. Richard (2003). Introduction to Classical Nahuatl (rev. ed. ed.). Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 0-8061-3452-6. 

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Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Mexica — Extensión máxima de los estados sometidos a los mexicas cuyos dirigentes asentados en México Tenochtitlan llamaron Cem Anáhuac Tenochca Tlalpan (El Mundo, Tierra Tenochca) …   Wikipedia Español

  • Mexica — Mexicas Monde aztèque Société aztèque Nahuatl Mythologie aztèque Religion aztèque Astrologie aztèque …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Mexica — Die Symbole der drei Mitglieder des aztekischen Dreibundes: Texcoco, Tenochtitlán und Tlacopán (von links) auf Seite 34 des Kodex Osuna Die Azteken (von Nahuatl aztecatl, deutsch etwa „jemand, der aus Aztlán kommt“) waren eine mesoamerikanische… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Méxica — Die Symbole der drei Mitglieder des aztekischen Dreibundes: Texcoco, Tenochtitlán und Tlacopán (von links) auf Seite 34 des Kodex Osuna Die Azteken (von Nahuatl aztecatl, deutsch etwa „jemand, der aus Aztlán kommt“) waren eine mesoamerikanische… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • mexica — 1 s m Grupo indígena mesoamericano, hablante de náhuatl, que hacia 1327 fundó Tenochtitlán y posteriormente Tlatelolco, las dos ciudades gemelas que después constituirían el centro de la actual ciudad de México. En el siglo XV formó la Triple… …   Español en México

  • mexica — ˈmehēˌkä, ˈmāh noun ( s) Usage: usually capitalized Etymology: Spanish méxica, probably from Nahuatl Mexictli, an Aztec war god : nahuatl …   Useful english dictionary

  • mexica — ► adjetivo/ sustantivo masculino femenino HISTORIA Se aplica al grupo indígena que fundó la ciudad de México Tenochtitlan a principios del siglo xiv y que llegó a dominar gran parte del territorio mesoamericano, cuyo imperio terminó con la… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • mexicà — me|xi|cà Mot Agut Adjectiu variable …   Diccionari Català-Català

  • mexica — me·xi·ca …   English syllables


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