Daišan

Daišan
Prince Li of the First Rank
Portrait of Daišan by an unknown Qing Dynasty painter
Spouse Lady Ligiya
Lady Yehenara, concubine
Lady Yehenara, concubine
Lady Hadanara, concubine
Lady Borjigit, concubine
Princess Taisong, concubine
Lady Fuca, concubine
Issue
Yoto, Prince Keqin
Šoto, Beile
Sahaliyen , Prince Ying
Wakda, Prince Qian
Balama
Duke Majan
Mandahai, Prince Xun
Huse, Prince Hui
Full name
Aisin Gioro Daišan
Posthumous name
Lie 烈
House House of Aisin Gioro
Father Nurhaci
Mother Lady Tunggiya
Born 19 August 1583(1583-08-19)
Died 25 November 1648(1648-11-25) (aged 65)
Beijing

Daišan (Manchu: Daišan1.png, Chinese: 代善; Dàishàn) (19 August 1583 - 25 November 1648) was an influential Manchu statesman and an imperial prince of the Qing Dynasty.

Contents

Family Background

He the second son of Nurhaci, the founder of the Qing Dynasty. His mother was Lady Tunggiya (佟佳氏), Nurhaci's initial consort.[1]

Career

Early career during the reign of Nurhaci

During Nurhaci's campaign against the Ula tribe and its beile Bujantai in 1607, he distinguished himself on the battlefield by assisting Šurhaci and Cuyen, for this, he was rewarded the title, Guyen Baturu (Chinese: 古英巴圖魯) ("exploring hero").

In 1613, he again distinguished himself on the battlefield in Nurhaci's campaign against Ula.

In 1616, when Nurhaci declared himself khan and established the LaterJin Dynasty, Daišan was the first selected as beile of a special rank by Nurhaci to assist in administration these four beile would be known as the Four Senior Beile the other places being filled by Amin, Manggūltai, and Hung Taiji .

From 1618, when the campaign against the Ming Dynasty began with the pronouncement of the Seven Grievances by Nurhaci, until 1622 Daišan was a leading general and as captain of the Plain Red Banner, played an important part in the capture of Fushun in 1618, in the victory at the Battle of Sarhū in 1619, and in the occupation of Shenyang in 1621. Starting in 1621 he and the other three Senior beile took rotated monthly as assistants to Nurhaci in directing of national affairs of the Later Jin Dynasty.

Hung Taiji's reign

With the death of Nurhaci at the Battle of Ningyuan in 1626, Daišan was able to used his influence to make the princes and generals come to an agreement on Hung Taiji's accession as khan. However even though Hung Taiji had succeeded as khan, Daišan along with Manggūltai and Amin continued to take turns as assistant administrators until 1629 as Hung Taiji began to consolidate his power. During 1629-1634, Daišan took part in most of the campaigns of Hung Taiji against the Ming. In 1636 Hung Taiji assumed the title of emperor with the proclamation of the Qing Dynasty. Daišan was given the rank of Prince Li of the First Rank (Hošoi Doronggo Cin Wang) (和碩禮親王) in addition of the title "Elder Brother" (兄).

Shunzhi Emperor's reign

In 1643 Hung Taiji died and a successor was not named. At first Daišan named Hung Taiji’s eldest son, Hooge, but the he declined the offer to succeed his father. Ajige and Dodo wanted Dorgon to take the throne, but Dorgon declined on the ground that acceptance would be an act of disloyalty to the deceased emperor who had brought him up. The issue was finally settled when many generals who had fought under Hung Taiji and followed him as their commander declared that they wanted one of Hung Taiji’s sons on the throne. Thus the ninth son, Fulin (the future Shunzhi Emperor), then at the age of six years old, was proclaimed emperor, with Dorgon and Jirgalang acting as co-regents. Yet even after the entire Qing court had swore an oath of allegiance to the throne, and there was a conspiracy of princes to name Dorgon as emperor instead of Hung Taiji’s son, Fulin. Fulin Again Daišan decided the issue by supporting Fulin and by exposing the conspirators, which was his own son, Šoto and his grandson Adali, the eldest son of Sahaliyen. Dorgon and Daišan had them both executed.

Death and Legacy

From the historical records, it seems Daišan never attempted to claim power for himself and instead worked for the benefit of the Imperial Family. In 1643 he led a council of princes to appoint Jirgalang and Dorgon as co-regents for the Shunzhi Emperor. In 1644 he followed Dorgon to Beijing where he died four years later.

At the time of his death, special posthumous honors were not awarded to him, except that the sum of 10,000 taels instead of the usual 5,000 was given to his family for his funeral and a memorial tablet was erected. Later emperors would come to recognize and appreciate the work he did for the dynasty and the Imperial Family. The Kangxi Emperor awarded the posthumous name Lie (Chinese: ; pinyin: liè) in 1671. In 1754 the Qianlong Emperor ordered that Daišan’s name be celebrated in the Temple of Princes at Mukden and in 1778, the Daišan lauded him and Jirgalang, Dorgon, Haoge and Yoto for their illustrious accomplishments in the early days of the dynasty and ordered that their names be celebrated in the Imperial Ancestral Temple.

At the same time the titles of these five, as well as those of Dodo, Šurhaci, and Lekedehun, were given rights of perpetual inheritance. The designation of Daišan's title, which, after his death, had been twice altered under his brother Mandahai and grandson Giyesu, was then restored to Li, and the inheritor ranked higher in the Court ceremonies than any other prince.

Daišan had a total of eight sons. The seventh, Mandahai, inherited the rank of Prince of the First Degree, which passed to his son. But in 1659 the princedom was taken from Mandahai's branch of the family and given to Daišan's grandson, Giyesu, whose descendants held it until the close of the dynasty. The eldest son, Yoto was made Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王岳托) and the third, Sahaliyen, held the rank of Prince Ying of the First Rank (穎親王薩哈璘). Sahaliyen's son, Lekedehun, was named Prince Shuncheng of the Second Rank (順承郡王) in 1648. Daišan 's fourth son, Wakda held the rank of a Prince Qian of the Second Rank (謙郡王瓦克達). Wakda was canonized as Xiang (Chinese: ; pinyin: xiāng), but this title was not accorded the right of perpetual inheritance.

Personal information

  • Father
  • Mother
    • Lady Tunggiya (佟佳氏), given name Hahana Jacing (哈哈納扎青), daughter of Tabonbayan (塔木巴晏). She married Nurhaci in 1577 as his first wife and initial consort. After the founding of the Qing Dynasty, she was posthumously honored as the First Consort (元妃; Yuan Fei)
  • Wife
    • Lady Ligiya (李佳氏), daughter of Dachu Habayan (達褚祜巴晏); mother of Yoto and Šoto
  • Concubine
    • Lady Yehenara (葉赫納喇氏), mother of Sahaliyen, Wakda, and Balama
    • Lady Yehenara (葉赫納喇氏), mother of Mandahai and Huse
    • Lady Hadanara (哈達納喇氏), mother of Majan
    • Lady Borjigit (博爾濟吉特氏)
    • Princess Taisong (泰松公主)
    • Lady Fuca (富察氏)
  • Sons
    • Yoto (岳託) (died 1638), created Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王), was one of the Qing Dynasty's 12 iron-cap princes; married the second daughter of Hadanara Worgudai (哈達部納喇.吳爾古代) and Mangguji, Princess Hada (third daughter of Nurhaci)
    • Šoto (碩託), created a Beile (貝勒)
    • Sahaliyen (薩哈璘) (1604–1636), created Prince Ying of the First Rank (穎親王), granted the posthumous name Yi (毅)
    • Wakda (瓦克達), created Prince Qian of the Second Rank (謙郡王), granted the posthumous name Xiang (襄)
    • Balama (巴喇瑪)
    • Majan (瑪佔), created a Duke of the Sixth Rank (奉恩輔國公)
    • Mandahai (滿達海) (1622–1652), initially created a Beile (貝勒), later created Prince Xun of the First Rank (巽親王), granted the posthumous name Jian (簡)
    • Huse (祜塞), created Prince Hui of the First Rank (惠親王), granted the posthumous name Shun (順)

Descendants

  • 1st son: Yoto, Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王岳托) (died 1638), married Lady Hadanara (哈達那拉氏)
    • 1st son: Yueluohuan (岳洛歡)
    • 2nd son: Luoluokun (羅洛渾) (1616–1646), created Prince Yanxi of the Second Rank (衍僖郡王) in 1639, granted the posthumous name Jie (介)
      • Son: Luokeduo (羅科鐸) (1640–1682), created Prince Ping of the Second Rank (平郡王) in 1648, granted the posthumous name Bi (比)
        • 1st son: Ne'ertu (訥爾圖) (1665–1687), became Prince Ping of the Second Rank (平郡王) in 1683, was later stripped of the title
          • Son: Neqinge (訥清額) (1692–1765), posthumously created Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王)
            • Son: Yalanga (雅朗阿) (1733–1794), became Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王) in 1780, granted the posthumous name Zhuang (莊)
              • 1st son: Hengjin (恆謹) (died 1799), became Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王) in 1795, was later stripped of the title
              • 2nd son: Hengyuan (恆元) (1750–1789), posthumously created Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王)
                • Son: Shangge (尚格) (1770–1833), became Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王) in 1799, granted the posthumous name Jian (簡)
                  • Son: Chengshuo (承碩) (1802–1839), became Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王) in 1833, granted the posthumous name Ke (恪)
                    • Son: Qinghui (慶惠) (1819–1861), became Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王) in 1842, granted the posthumous name Min (敏)
                      • Son: Jinqi (晉祺) (1840–1900), became Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王) in 1861, granted the posthumous name Cheng (誠)
                        • Son: Songjie (崧傑) (1879–1910), became Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王) in 1900, granted the posthumous name Shun (順)
                          • Son: Yansen (晏森) (1896 - ?), became Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王) in 1910
                            • Son: Binyuan (彬沅) (born 1918)
        • 2nd son: Ne'erfu (訥爾福) (1671–1701), became Prince Ping of the Second Rank (平郡王) in 1687, granted the posthumous name Dao (悼)
          • Son: Ne'ersu (訥爾蘇) (1690–1740), became Prince Ping of the Second Rank (平郡王) in 1701, lost title in 1726
            • 1st son: Fupeng (福彭) (1708–1748), became Prince Ping of the Second Rank (平郡王) in 1726, granted the posthumous name Min (敏)
              • Son: Qingming (慶明) (1732–1750), became Prince Ping of the Second Rank (平郡王) in 1749, granted the posthumous name Xi (僖)
            • 2nd son: Fuxiu (福秀) (1710–1740), created a Beizi (貝子)
              • Son: Qingheng (慶恆) (1733–1779), adopted by his uncle Fupeng, became Prince Keqin of the Second Rank (克勤郡王) in 1750 following the death of his cousin, granted the posthumous name Liang (良)
    • 3rd son: Karchuhun (喀爾楚諢), created Beile Xianrong of the Third Rank (多羅顯榮貝勒)
    • 4th son: Barchuhun (巴爾楚諢), created Beile Hehui of the Third Rank (多羅和惠貝勒)
    • 5th son: Basiha (巴思哈), created a General of the Ninth Rank (鎮國將軍)
    • 6th son: Hulibu (祜里布), created Beile Gangyi of the Third Rank (多羅剛毅貝勒)
    • 7th son: Fuyingwu (富英武)
  • 2nd son: Šoto, Beile (貝勒碩託)
    • 1st son: Laka (喇喀)
    • 2nd son: Qilanbu (齊蘭布)
    • 3rd son: Yuesaibu (岳賽布)
  • 3rd son: Sahaliyen, Prince Ying of the First Rank (穎親王薩哈璘) (1604–1636)
    • 1st son: Adali (阿達禮)
    • 2nd son: Lekedehun (勒克德渾) (1619 - April/early May 1652), created a Beile (貝勒) in 1644, created Prince Shuncheng of the Second Rank (順承郡王) in 1648, granted the posthumous name Gonghui (恭惠), was one of the Qing Dynasty's 12 iron-cap princes
      • Norobu
      • Lergiyen
    • 3rd son: Dulan (杜蘭)
  • 4th son: Wakda, Prince Qian of the Second Rank (謙郡王瓦克達)
    • 1st son: Bakda (巴克達)
    • 2nd son: Liuyong (留雍)
    • 3rd son: Garsai (噶爾塞)
  • 5th son: Balama (巴喇瑪)
  • 6th son: Majan, Duke of the Sixth Rank (奉恩輔國公瑪佔)
  • 7th: Mandahai, Prince Xun of the First Rank (巽親王滿達海) (1622–1652)
    • 1st son: Canggadai (常阿岱), created Beile Huaihan of the Third Rank (多羅懷憨貝勒)
    • 2nd son: Lengsaiyi (楞塞宜)
  • 8th son: Huse, Prince Hui of the First Rank (惠親王祜塞)
    • 1st son: Alin (阿林)
    • 2nd son: Jinggi (精濟), created Prince Huaihan of the Second Rank (多羅懷憨郡王)
    • 3rd son: Giyesu (杰書) (died 1697), created Prince Kang of the First Rank (和碩康親王), granted the posthumous name Liang (良)

Notes

  1. ^ She was posthumously honored as the First Consort (元妃; Yuan Fei) under the Qing Dynasty.

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • DAISAN NO SHINJIN —    See THIRD GENERATION …   Japanese literature and theater

  • Shin daisan no gokudô - boppatsu Kansai gokudô sensô — Filmdaten Deutscher Titel: The Third Yakuza, Teil I Originaltitel: Shin Dai san Gokudō: Boppatsu: Kansai Gokudō Wōzu!! Produktionsland: Japan Erscheinungsjahr: 1996 Länge: 87 Minuten Originalsprache: Japanisch …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Волчица и пряности — Волчица и пряности …   Википедия

  • Takashi Miike — 三池 崇史 Miike at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Born August 24, 1960 (1960 08 24) (age 51) Yao, Osaka, Japan …   Wikipedia

  • Bardaisan — ( sy. ܒܪܕܝܨܢ, unicode|Bardaiṣān ; 154–222; also Latinized as Bardesanes ) was a Syriac gnostic, founder of the Bardaisanites, and an outstanding scientist, scholar, astrologist, philosopher and poet, also renowned for his knowledge of India, on… …   Wikipedia

  • Takeshi Kawamura — is a Japanese playwright and director. He gained recognition in the 1980s for his popular culture influenced, violent, highly physical plays. Building upon this early work with later projects of social criticism and postmodern theatrical… …   Wikipedia

  • Miike — Takashi Miike Takashi Miike Naissance 24 août 1960 Yao  Japon Nationalité(s) …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Takashi Miike — 三池 崇史 Takashi Miike au festival de Cannes 2011 Données clés Naissance 2 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Aisin Gioro — Royal house surname =Aisin Gioro Clan estate =China coat of arms = country =China, Manchukuo parent house = titles =Emperor of China founder =Emperor Nurhaci final ruler =Xuantong Emperor (Puyi) current head =Hengzhen founding year =1644… …   Wikipedia

  • Takashi Miike — 三池 崇史 Nacimiento 24 de agosto de 1960 (51 años) Yao, Osak …   Wikipedia Español


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.