Glamour photography


Glamour photography

Glamour photography is the photographing of a model with the emphasis on the subject. Photographers use a combination of cosmetics, lighting and airbrushing techniques to produce the most physically and sexually appealing image of the model possible. Thomas, Mike " [http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=517981631&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=53018&RQT=309&VName=PQD Glamour shots take writer from bland to Bond] " Toronto Star, Sec. B. pg. J.3, May 12, 1994 (as cited by ProQuest)] Peterson, Maggie Wolff " [http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=6019403&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=53018&RQT=309&VName=PQD The glamour side of photography] " North Valley Business Journal, Vol.5, Issue. 11; Sec. 1. pg. 1, September 1994. (as cited by ProQuest)]

Magazines and movie stars

Standards of glamour photography have changed over time, reflecting changes in social acceptance.In the early 1920s, USA photographers like Ruth Harriet Louise and George Hurrell photographed celebrities to glamourise their stature by utilizing lighting techniques to develop dramatic effects.Mick LaSalle " [http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index=43&did=18027615&SrchMode=1&sid=1&Fmt=3&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1183019649&clientId=53018 Lights Up on Hollywood's Hurrell / Special focuses on the inventor of the glamour-shot style] " San Francisco Chronicle, January 16, 1995] During World War II pin-up pictures of scantily clad movie stars were extremely popular among US servicemen. However, until the 1950s, the use of glamour photography in advertising or men’s magazines was highly controversial or even illegal. Magazines featuring glamour photography were sometimes marketed as "art magazines" or "health magazines".

Popular portraiture

Since the 1990s glamour photography has increased in popularity among the public. Glamour portrait studios opened, offering professional hair and makeup artists and professional retouching to allow the general public to have the "model" experience. These sometimes include "boudoir" portraits but are more commonly used by professionals and high school seniors who want to look "their best" for their portraits.

Magazines

"Playboy" was instrumental in changing the world of glamour photography as the first magazine that focused on nude models and was targeted at the mainstream consumer. In December 1953, Hugh Hefner published the first edition of "Playboy" with Marilyn Monroe on the cover and nude photos of Monroe inside. Monroe's star status and charming personality helped to diminish the public outcry. When asked what she had on during the photoshoot, she replied "the radio". After "Playboy" broke through, many magazines followed and this was instrumental in opening the market for the introduction of glamour photography into modern society. Today, softcore nude photographs of models appear in publications such as "Perfect 10" or tabloid newspapers such as Britain's "The Sun"'s Page 3.

Recently several popular glamour magazines known as lad mags are reversing the trend by emphasizing glamour while showing less nudity, in favor of implied (covered) nudity or toplessness such as the handbra technique, where a woman hides her nipples and areolae by covering both breasts with her own hands, or those of another person. [cite web | title= Nuts sexiest pictures| | publisher = "Nuts (magazine)" |url=http://www.nuts.co.uk/covergirls/issue-49-nuts-sexiest-pictures/123 | accessdate = 2007-04-26 ] Examples include "FHM" (For Him Magazine) and "Maxim" magazines, which launched in 1994 and 1995, respectively.

Related photography genres

*History of erotic photography
*Fashion photography
*Softcore

See also

*Gravure idol
*Erotic capital

References


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