Gross value added


Gross value added

Gross Value Added or GVA is a measure in economics of the value of goods and services produced in an area or sector of an economy. [cite web|url=http://www.kent.gov.uk/NR/rdonlyres/FAB3A161-2BB5-40EA-891F-0E2624C7C5E9/5304/ecn0206gvabriefing.pdf|title=Gross Value Added (GVA) Briefing Paper|accessdate=2008-03-29|date=2007-10-29|format=pdf|publisher=Kent County Council]

Relationship to Gross Domestic Product

GVA is linked as a measurement to Gross Domestic Product (GDP), as both are measures of output. The relationship is defined as:

:GVA + taxes on products - subsidies on products = GDP

As the total aggregates of taxes on products and subsidies on products are only available at whole economy level, [cite web|url=http://www.statistics.gov.uk/cci/nugget.asp?id=254|title=Guide to Gross Value Added (GVA)|accessdate=2008-03-29|date=2002-11-15|publisher=Office for National Statistics] Gross Value Added is used for measuring Gross regional domestic product and other measures of the output of entities smaller than a whole economy.

ee also

*Measures of national income and output
*Gross domestic product
*Gross regional domestic product
*Value added
*Gross profit

References


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Gross Value Added - GVA — A productivity metric that measures the difference between output and intermediate consumption. Gross value added provides a dollar value for the amount of goods and services that have been produced, less the cost of all inputs and raw materials… …   Investment dictionary

  • Value added — refers to the additional value of a commodity over the cost of commodities used to produce it from the previous stage of production. An example is the price of gasoline at the pump over the price of the oil in it. In national accounts used in… …   Wikipedia

  • Value added tax — Taxation An aspect of fiscal policy …   Wikipedia

  • Gross Output — is an economic concept used in national accounts such as the United Nations System of National Accounts (UNSNA) and the US National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA). It is equal to the value of net output or GDP (also known as gross value… …   Wikipedia

  • Gross regional domestic product — (GRDP) or Gross Domestic Product of Region (GDPR) is a subnational gross domestic product for measuring the size of that region s economy. It is the aggregate of gross value added (GVA) of all resident producer units in the region. The GRDP… …   Wikipedia

  • Gross operating surplus — (GOS) is the surplus due to owners of incorporated businesses. Often called profits, although only a subset of total costs are subtracted from gross output to calculate the GOS.Essentially it is sales less the cost of intermediate goods and… …   Wikipedia

  • Gross domestic product — GDP redirects here. For other uses, see GDP (disambiguation). Not to be confused with Gross national product or Gross domestic income. CIA World Factbook 2005 figures of total nominal GDP (top) compared to PPP adjusted GDP (bottom) …   Wikipedia

  • Value product — The value product (VP) is an economic concept formulated by Karl Marx in his critique of political economy during the 1860s, and used in Marxian social accounting theory for capitalist economies. Its annual monetary value is approximately equal… …   Wikipedia

  • Gross state product — (or gross regional product) is a measurement of the economic output of a state or province. It is the sum of all value added by industries within the state and serves as a counterpart to the gross domestic product or GDP.Conceptually, there is no …   Wikipedia

  • gross domestic product — GDP The monetary value of all the goods and services produced by an economy over a specified period. It is measured in three ways: (1) on the basis of expenditure, i.e. the value of all goods and services bought, including consumption, capital… …   Accounting dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.