First-person shooter engine

A first-person shooter engine simulates a 3D graphics environment for use in a first-person shooter computer or video game. First-person refers to the view where the players see the world from the eyes of their characters. Shooter refers to games which revolve primarily around killing other entities in the game world, usually NPC characters or other players.

Timeline

1970s and 1980s: Early FPS graphics engines

Widely varying requirements and characteristics, but with game rendering point intended to be from the first-person perspective and with the need to shoot things mostly made up using Vector graphics engines.
*"Maze War" (1973)
*"Spasim" (1974)
*"Battlezone" (1980)
*"MIDI Maze" (1987)
*"Driller" (1987) Freescape engine:* Dark Side (1988):* Total Eclipse (1988):* Castle Master (1990):* (1990):* The Sphinx Jinx (1991):* 3D Construction Kit (1991):* 3D Construction Kit II (1992)
*"The Colony" (1988)

Early 1990s: Wireframes to 3D Worlds and Textures

At the time, regarded as Doom clones, now referred to as 2.5D, as it is not full 3D. Planar worlds (rectangular grid in Wolfenstein 3D, sector-based plane levels in Doom) with sprite objects. Average Video Hardware requirements: CPU-powered software rendering. The Build engine used sprites for many things, but had arbitrary 3D-level geometry.

*"Hovertank 3D" (1990)
*"Catacomb 3D" (1991)
*"Wolfenstein 3D" (1992) Wolfenstein 3D Engine
**"Rise of the Triad" (1994)
*' (1992) Underworld Engine"'
**"System Shock" (1994)
*"Ken's Labyrinth" (1993)
*"Doom" (1993) id Tech 1
**"Heretic" (1994)
***"HeXen" (1995)
**"Strife" (1996)
*"Marathon" (1994)
**' (1995) Marathon 2 Engine"'
***"Damage Incorporated" (1997)
**"Marathon Infinity" (1996)
*' (1995) Jedi Engine"'
*"Duke Nukem 3D" (1996) Build Engine
**"Blood" (1997)
**"Shadow Warrior" (1997)

Mid-1990s: The rise of 3D Models and hardware acceleration

For the first time, game engines recreated true 3D worlds with arbitrary level geometry. Instead of sprites the engines used simply textured (single-pass texturing, no lighting details) polygon objects. Quake used fewer animated sprites, following the trend to 3D rather than 2D game objects, while Quake II was one of the first games to take advantage of hardware accelerated graphics.

Average Video Hardware requirements: first 3D-accelerators (Voodoo, Voodoo 2, Riva TNT. Introduced later in this generation were more powerful DirectX 6.0 chipsets such as Voodoo3 RIVA TNT2 and Rage 128. Many games still supported software rendering, as a powerful CPU was able to somewhat compensate for an older video card.

*"Descent" (1995)
**"Descent II" (1996)
**"Descent³" (1999) Fusion engine
*"Quake" (1996) Quake engine
**"Hexen II" (1997)
**"Half-Life" (1998) GoldSrc
***"Counter-Strike" (2000)
***"" (2002)
***"Day of Defeat" (2003)
*"GoldenEye 007" (1997) GoldenEye 007 engine
**"Perfect Dark" (2000)
*"Quake II" (1997) id Tech 2
**"Heretic II" (1998)
**"Sin" (1998)
**"" (1999)
**"Soldier of Fortune" (2000)
**"Daikatana" (2000)
**"Anachronox" (2001)
*' (1998) Lithtech 1.0"'
**"" (1998)

Late-1990s: 32-bit color becomes the standard, and introduction of hardware T&L

This period saw the introduction of the GeForce 256, the first GPU with hardware T&L, which, performance-wise, trumped the 3dfx Voodoo3, Matrox G400, and S3 Savage4 and led to the demise or withdrawal of these companies from the 3D gaming market. One year later, only ATI with their comparable Radeon 7200 series would remain in direct competition with Nvidia.

While all games of this period supported 16-bit color, many were adopting 32-bit color as well. Soon, many benchmark sites began touting 32-bit as a standard. An especially big milestone in first person shooter engines was the Unreal Engine, which has been used in a large number of FPS games since its release.

*"Unreal" (1998) Unreal engine
**"Unreal Tournament" (1999)
**"Deus Ex" (2000)
**"" (2000)
**"Clive Barker's Undying (2001)
*' (1998) Dark engine"'
**"System Shock 2 "(1999)
**"" (2000)
*"" (1998)
**"Tribes 2" (2001) Torque Game Engine
*"Quake III Arena" (1999) id Tech 3
**"" (2000)
**"Return to Castle Wolfenstein" (2001)
**"" (2002)
**"" (2002)
**"" (2003)
**"Call of Duty" (2003)
**"" 2003
***"" 2002
*"No One Lives Forever" (2000) Lithtech Talon
**"Alien vs. Predator 2" (2001)

Early 2000s: Increasing detail, outdoor environments, and rag-doll physics

New graphics hardware provided new capabilities, allowing new engines to add various new effects, such as particle effects, fog, coloured lighting, as well as increase texture and polygon detail. Many games featured large outdoor environments, vehicles, rag-doll physics.

Average Video Hardware requirements: a GPU with hardware T&L such as the DirectX 7.0 GeForce 2 or Radeon 7200 was typically required. The next-generation GeForce 3 or Radeon 8500 were recommended due to their more efficient architecture, though their DirectX 8.0 vertex and pixel shaders were of little use. A handful of games still supported DirectX 6.0 chipsets such as RIVA TNT2 and Rage 128, and software rendering (with an integrated Intel GMA), though this was apparent that even a powerful CPU could not compensate for the lack of hardware T&L.

*"Codename Eagle" (2000) Refractor Engine
**"Battlefield 1942" (2002) Refractor 2
***"Battlefield Vietnam" (2004)
***"Battlefield 2" (2005)
***"Battlefield 2142" (2006)
*"Max Payne" (2001) Remedy MaxFX
**"Max Payne 2" (2003)
*"Grand Theft Auto III" (2001) RenderWare Engine
**"" (2002)
**"" (2005)
*' (2002) SAGE Engine
*' (2002) LS3D engine"'
**"Vietcong" (2003)
**"Hidden & Dangerous 2" (2004)
*"Unreal Tournament 2003" (2002) Unreal Engine 2.0
**"" (2002)
**"" (2003)
*"No One Lives Forever 2" (2002) Lithtech Jupiter
**"Tron 2.0" (2003)
*"Global Operations" (2002) Lithtech 2.5
*"Metroid Prime" (2002)
**"" (2004)
*Cube: Game and engine (2002-2005)

Mid 2000s: Lighting and Pixel Shaders, Physics, and DirectX 9

The maps may feature seamlessly integrated indoor/outdoor environments. Some, or all of the pixel shader-based textures, bump mapping, vertex shaders used for animations, lighting and shadowing technologies are common. Shader technologies include HLSL, Cg, and GLSL.

This resulted in the obsolescence of DirectX 7.0 graphics chips such as the widespread GeForce 2 and Radeon 7200, as well as DirectX 6.0 chipsets such as RIVA TNT2 and Rage 128, and software rendering (with an integrated Intel GMA). Until this generation of games, a powerful CPU was able to somewhat compensate for an older video card. Average Video Hardware requirements: minimum was a GeForce 3 or Radeon 8500, strongly recommended was the GeForce FX, Radeon 9700 (or other cards with Pixel shader 2.x support). The Radeon 9700 demonstrated that anti-aliasing (AA) and/or anisotropic filtering (AF) could be fully usable options, even in the newest and most demanding titles at the time, and resulted in the widespread acceptance of AA and AF as standard features. AA and AF had been supported by many earlier graphics chips prior to this but carried a heavy performance hit and so most gamers opted not to enable these features.

*"AMP2 Tech Demo" (2003) AMP2 Engine
*"Tribes Vengeance" (2004) Unreal Engine 2.5
*"Painkiller" (2004) PAIN engine
*"Far Cry" (2004) CryEngine
*"Sauerbraten": Game and engine (2004 - present)
*"Doom 3" (2004) id Tech 4
**"Quake 4" (2005)
**"Prey" (2006)
**"" (2007)
*"" (2001)
**"Halo 2" (2004)
**"Stubbs the Zombie in Rebel Without a Pulse" (2005)
*"Half-Life 2" (2004) Source engine
**"" (2006)
**"" (2007)
**"" (2004)
**"Team Fortress 2" (2007)
**"Portal" (2007)
**"" (2004)
**"" (2005)
**"Dark Messiah of Might and Magic" (2006)
**"Sin Episodes - Emergence" (2006)
*"Nexuiz" (2005) DarkPlaces
*"F.E.A.R." (2005) Lithtech Jupiter EX
*"Call of Duty 2" (2005)
*"Call of Duty 3" (2006)
*"Red Steel" (2006)

Later 2000s: DX10 and the approach to Photorealism

Developers of this era of 3D engines often tout their increasingly photorealistic quality. The first games using "Unreal Engine 3" were released in November 2006, and the first games to use CryEngine 2 were released in 2007. These games will include realistic shader-based materials with predefined physics, environments with procedural and vertex shader-based objects (vegetation, debris, human-made objects such as books or tools), procedural animation, cinematographic effects (depth of field, motion blur, etc.), and unified lighting models with soft shadowing. Average Video Hardware requirements: GeForce 7 and Radeon X1xxx (for Shader Model 3 games), Geforce 8 and Radeon HD 2xxx/3xxx (for Shader Model 4 games).

Another interesting prospective is the Sauerbraten FPS game and engine. Although it is still in early development (as a continuation of Cube), the simple engine framework and in-game map editing make the game stand out.

*"Gears of War" (2006) Unreal Engine 3
**"BioShock" (2007)
**"Unreal Tournament 3" (2007)
**"Gears of War 2" (2008)
*"" (2007)
**"" (2008)
*"" (2007) SAGE engine
*"Crysis" (2007) CryEngine 2
**"Crysis Warhead" (2008)
*"Far Cry 2" (2008) Dunia Engine
*' (2008) Neon Engine"'
*"Project Offset" (TBA) Offset Engine
*' (TBA) RelentENGINE"'
*" Rage" (TBA) id Tech 5
*" Armed" (TBA) Kings Engine
*"The Conduit" (2009) Quantum3

References

ee also

*Game engine
*List of game engines


Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • First-person shooter (disambiguation) — First person shooter is a genre of video games. It may also refer to:*First person shooter engine, the type of game engine used in FPS games *Massively multiplayer online first person shooter, an MMO that features FPS gameplay *William Gibson s… …   Wikipedia

  • First-person shooter — This article is about the video game genre. For other uses, see First person shooter (disambiguation). A screenshot …   Wikipedia

  • First-Person-Shooter — Ego Shooter (gr. und lat. ego = „ich“; engl. shooter = „Schütze“ bzw. „Schießspiel“) oder First Person Shooter (FPS) sind eine Kategorie der Computerspiele, bei welcher der Spieler aus der Egoperspektive in der Spielwelt agiert und mit… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • First-Person Shooter — Ego Shooter (gr. und lat. ego = „ich“; engl. shooter = „Schütze“ bzw. „Schießspiel“) oder First Person Shooter (FPS) sind eine Kategorie der Computerspiele, bei welcher der Spieler aus der Egoperspektive in der Spielwelt agiert und mit… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • First Person Shooter — Ego Shooter (gr. und lat. ego = „ich“; engl. shooter = „Schütze“ bzw. „Schießspiel“) oder First Person Shooter (FPS) sind eine Kategorie der Computerspiele, bei welcher der Spieler aus der Egoperspektive in der Spielwelt agiert und mit… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Massively multiplayer online first-person shooter — (MMOFPS) is a sub category of the massively multiplayer online game (MMOG) Internet computer game genre, which combines first person shooter style gameplay with the game design elements that typify the MMOG genre; namely, a persistent world… …   Wikipedia

  • First person (video games) — In video games, first person refers to a graphical perspective rendered from the viewpoint of the player character. In many cases, this may be the viewpoint from the cockpit of a vehicle. Many different genres have made use of first person… …   Wikipedia

  • Third-Person Shooter — Third Person Shooter, kurz TPS genannt, sind Computerspiele, bei denen der Spieler die Welt aus einer Perspektive beobachtet, die im Normalfall hinter der Hauptfigur positioniert ist (Drittpersonansicht) und in denen Fernkampf ein wesentliches… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Third-Person-Shooter — Bildschirmfoto des freien Third Person Shooters Dead Justice von Cat Mother Third Person Shooter (abgekürzt TPS, von Englisch third person, „Drittperson“ und shooter, „Schießspiel“) sind Computerspiele, bei denen der Spieler die Welt aus einer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • First Encounter Assault and Recon — F.E.A.R. Offizielles Logo Entwickler: Monolith Productions Verleger …   Deutsch Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.