Nachzehrer

A Nachzehrer is a sort of German vampire. Nachzehrer translates "afterwards (nach) devourer (zehrer)". The Nachzehrer was prominent in the folklore of the northern regions of Germany, including Silesia and Bavaria, and also with the Kashubes of Northern Poland. Though officially a vampire, they are also similar to zombies, and in many ways different from either undead. The nachzehrer is not a blood-sucker, but rather consumes already dead bodies.

A nachzehrer is created most commonly after suicide, and sometimes from an accidental death. According to German lore, you don't become one from being bitten, or scratched. It is just something that happens. Nachzehrers are also related to sickness and disease. If a large group of people died of the plague (chlamidye), the first person to have died is believed to be a nachzehrer.

Typically a Nachzehrer devours its family members upon waking. Its also been said that they devour themselves, including their funeral shroud, and the more of themselves they eat, the more of their family they physically drain. It is not unlikely that the idea of the dead eating themselves might have risen from bodies in open graves who had been partly eaten by scavengers like rats.

Some Kashubes believed that the Nachzehrer would leave its grave, shapeshifting into the form of a pig, and pay a visit to their family members to feast on their blood. In addition, the Nachzehrer was able to ascend to a church belfry to ring the bells, bringing death to anyone who hears them. Another lesser known ability of the Nachzehrer is the power it had to bring death by causing its shadow to fall upon someone. Those hunting the Nachzehrer in the graveyard would listen for grunting sounds that it would make while it munched on its grave clothes.[1]

The Nachzehrer was similar to the Slavic vampire in that it was known to be a recently deceased person who returned from the grave to attack family and village acquaintances. It usually originated from an unusual death such as a person who died by suicide or accident. They were also associated with epidemic sickness, such as whenever a group of people died from the same disease, the person who died first was labeled to be the cause of the group's death. Another belief was that if a person's name was not removed from his burial clothing, that person would be a candidate for becoming a Nachzehrer.

To protect themselves from the Nachzehrer, villagers would place clumps of earth under the vampire's chin, place a coin or stone in its mouth, or tie a handkerchief tightly around its neck. In other cases, the corpse would be beheaded, a spike would be driven through head to pin the corpse to the ground, or the tongue would be fixed into place.[2]}}

The official killing myth says you can kill a Nachzehrer by placing a coin in its mouth, and then chopping off its head. It can be discerned from this that a mere coin in the mouth may result in paralysis as some myths say that a stake through a vampires heart does.

It is characteristic of a Nachzehrer to lie in its grave with its thumb in its opposite hand, and its left eye open.

See also

  • Draugr - another culturally Teutonic corporeal undead

References

  1. ^ [Bunson, Matthew (1993) The Vampire Encyclopedia p. 185,186, Gramercy, ISBN 0-517-16206-7]
  2. ^ Deliriums Realm

Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Nachzehrer — ist die im deutschen Volksglauben übliche Bezeichnung für einen Wiedergänger oder Untoten, der den Vampiren sehr nah verwandt ist und mit ihm eine Reihe wesentlicher Eigenschaften teilt. Im Gegensatz zu einer lange Zeit gültigen Auffassung in der …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Nachzehrer — Nachzehrer, im nördlichen Deutschland Bezeichnung für Vampir (s. d.) …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Nachzehrer — (NOCT zeer her) Variations: Totenküsser In the vampire lore of Germany, the nachzehrer ( night waster ) is a vampiric REVENANT (see GERMAN VAMPIRES). It is created when money is not placed inside the mouth of the deceased before he is buried or… …   Encyclopedia of vampire mythology

  • Upir — Vampire (auch Vampyre; vom serbischen: vampir) sind im Volksglauben und der Mythologie Blut saugende Nachtgestalten, und zwar meist wiederbelebte menschliche Leichname, die von menschlichem oder tierischem Blut leben und übernatürliche Kräfte… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Böser Blick — Angriff auf den Bösen Blick: Das Auge wird von Schwert und Dreizack durchbohrt, Rabe, Hund, Katze, Schlange, Skorpion und Tausendfüßler greifen es an. Ein Zwerg mit groteskem Penis kreuzt zwei Stöckchen. Römisches Mosaik aus dem Haus des Bösen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Hämatophilie — Der Vampirismus bezeichnet grundsätzlich eine Affinität zum Blutsaugen in Literatur und Historie meist wörtlich gemeint, aber auch im übertragenen Sinne zu verstehen: Nämlich als das Gewinnen von (meist überirdischer) Stärke durch das Absaugen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Moderne Vampire — Der Vampirismus bezeichnet grundsätzlich eine Affinität zum Blutsaugen in Literatur und Historie meist wörtlich gemeint, aber auch im übertragenen Sinne zu verstehen: Nämlich als das Gewinnen von (meist überirdischer) Stärke durch das Absaugen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Moderner Vampir — Der Vampirismus bezeichnet grundsätzlich eine Affinität zum Blutsaugen in Literatur und Historie meist wörtlich gemeint, aber auch im übertragenen Sinne zu verstehen: Nämlich als das Gewinnen von (meist überirdischer) Stärke durch das Absaugen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Untot — Als Untote bezeichnet man Kreaturen, die in einem körperlichen Zustand zwischen Leben und Tod existieren. Untote ist ein Sammelbegriff sowohl für Wesen aus Mythologie und Folklore als auch für solche, die ihren Ursprung in der (Horror )Literatur… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Untote — Als Untote bezeichnet man Kreaturen, die in einem körperlichen Zustand zwischen Leben und Tod existieren. Untote ist ein Sammelbegriff sowohl für Wesen aus Mythologie und Folklore als auch für solche, die ihren Ursprung in der (Horror )Literatur… …   Deutsch Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.