Aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva

Infobox_Disease
Name = PAGENAME



Caption = Aorta laid open to show the semilunar valves. (Aortic sinus, also known as "sinus of Valsalva", is labeled at upper right.)
DiseasesDB = 32260
ICD10 = ICD10|Q|25|4|q|20
(EUROCAT Q25.43)
ICD9 =
ICDO =
OMIM =
MedlinePlus =
eMedicineSubj = med
eMedicineTopic = 2133
eMedicine_mult = eMedicine2|ped|2106
MeshID =

'Aneurysm of the aortic sinus', also known as the sinus of Valsalva, is comparatively rare, occurring in about one person in every thousand.Fact|date=November 2007 When present, it is usually in either the right (65-85%) or in the noncoronary (10-30%) sinus, rarely in the left (< 5%) sinus. This type of aneurysm is typically congenital and may be associated with heart defects. It is sometimes associated with Marfan syndrome or Loeys-Dietz syndrome, but may also result from Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, atherosclerosis, syphilis, cystic medial necrosis, chest injury, or infective endocarditis.

If unruptured, this type aneurysm may be asymptomatic and therefore go undetected until symptoms appear or medical imaging is performed for other reasons.

Treatment

Medical therapy of aneurysm of the aortic sinus includes blood pressure control through the use of drugs, such as beta blockers. The definitive treatment is surgical repair. The determination to perform surgery is usually based upon the diameter of the aortic root, with 5 centimeters being a rule of thumb, and the rate of increase in its size, as determined through repeated echocardiography. (A normal size, by comparison, is 2-3 centimeters.) In 2005, NBA basketball players Ronny Turiaf and Fred Hoiberg underwent successful surgery to correct enlarged aortic roots.

ee also

* Aortic aneurysm


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