Prune


Prune
Fresh prunes (Prunus domestica)
Dried prune

A prune is any of various plum cultivars, mostly Prunus domestica or European Plum, sold as fresh or dried fruit. The dried fruit is also referred to as a dried plum. In general, fresh prunes are freestone cultivars (the pit is easy to remove), whereas most other plums grown for fresh consumption are clingstone (the pit is more difficult to remove).

Contents

Production

More than 1,000 cultivars of plums are grown for drying. The main cultivar grown in the US is the Improved French prune. Other varieties include Sutter, Tulare Giant, Moyer, Imperial, Italian, and Greengage. Fresh prunes reach the market earlier than fresh plums and are usually smaller in size.

Marketing change

Due to popular perception (in the U.S.) of prunes being used only for relief of constipation, and being the subject of related distasteful joking, many of today's distributors have stopped using the word "prune" on packaging labels. Their preference is to state "dried plums".[1]

Uses

Plums, dried (prunes), uncooked
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 1,006 kJ (240 kcal)
Carbohydrates 63.88 g
- Sugars 38.13 g
- Dietary fibre 7.1 g
Fat 0.38 g
Protein 2.18 g
Vitamin A 781 IU
Vitamin C 0.6 mg (1%)
Phosphorus 69 mg (10%)
Potassium 732 mg (16%)
1 prune, pitted 9.5 g
1 cup, pitted 174 g
Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Prunes are used in cooking both sweet and savory dishes. Stewed prunes, a compote, are a dessert. Prunes are a frequent ingredient in North African tagines. Perhaps the best-known gastronomic prunes are those of Agen (pruneaux d'Agen). Prunes are used frequently in Tzimmes, a traditional Jewish dish in which the principal ingredient is diced or sliced carrots; in the Nordic prune kisel, eaten with rice pudding[disambiguation needed ] in the Christmas dinner; and in the traditional Norwegian dessert fruit soup. Prunes have also been included in other holiday dishes, such as stuffing, cake, and to make sugar plums.

Health benefits

Prune juice is made by softening prunes through steaming and then putting them through a pulper to create a watery puree. Prunes and their juice contain mild laxatives including phenolic compounds (mainly as neochlorogenic acids and chlorogenic acids) and sorbitol.[2] Faster results are obtained by heating the prune juice.[citation needed] Prunes also contain dietary fiber (about 6%, or 0.06 g per gram of prune). Prunes and prune juice are thus common home remedies for constipation. Prunes also have a high antioxidant content.[3] In China, the popular summer drink suanmeitang, made with sour prunes, is sometimes thought to have positive effects on acidity in the body.[by whom?]

In popular culture

  • There has long been an urban myth that prune juice is an ingredient in Dr Pepper.[4]
  • Worf, from Star Trek: The Next Generation enjoys prune juice, proclaiming it "a warrior's drink".[5]
  • Prunes and prune juice are recurring elements in Frank Zappa's album, Absolutely Free.

See also

References

  1. ^ Janick, Jules and Robert E. Paull (2008). The encyclopedia of fruit & nuts. CABI. ISBN 0851996388. p. 696.
  2. ^ Stacewicz-Sapuntzakis, M; Bowen, PE; Hussain, EA; Damayanti-Wood, BI; Farnsworth, NR (2001). "Chemical composition and potential health effects of prunes: a functional food?". Critical reviews in food science and nutrition 41 (4): 251–86. doi:10.1080/20014091091814. PMID 11401245. 
  3. ^ "Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) of Selected Foods" (PDF). United States Department of Agriculture. November 2007. http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/12354500/Data/ORAC/ORAC07.pdf. Retrieved 2009-10-27. 
  4. ^ Mikkelson, Barbara (27 February 2007). "Belle Pepper". Snopes. http://www.snopes.com/business/secret/drpepper.asp. Retrieved 2007-04-05. "Dr Pepper doesn't contain any prune juice, but this rumor has been remarkably long-lived, having been with us since about 1930." 
  5. ^ Star Trek: The Next Generation - "Yesterday's Enterprise"; S03E15.

External links


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Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • prune — prune …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • prune — [ pryn ] n. f. et adj. inv. • 1265; lat. pruna, de prunum 1 ♦ Fruit du prunier, de forme ronde ou allongée, à peau fine, de couleur variable, à chair juteuse, sucrée, agréable au goût. ⇒ mirabelle, quetsche, reine claude. La prune est une drupe à …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • prune — PRUNE. s. f. Sorte de fruit à noyau dont il y en a de diverses sortes. Grosse prune. bonne prune. prune qui quitte le noyau. prune imperiale. prune de damas. prune de perdrigon. prune diaprée. prune de sainte Catherine. prune de damas violet.… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Prune — Prune, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pruned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pruning}.] [OE. proine, probably fr. F. provigner to lay down vine stocks for propagation; hence, probably, the meaning, to cut away superfluous shoots. See {Provine}.] 1. To lop or cut off… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Prune — Prune, n. [F. prune, from L. prunum a plum. See {Plum}.] A plum; esp., a dried plum, used in cookery; as, French or Turkish prunes; California prunes. [1913 Webster] {German prune} (Bot.), a large dark purple plum, of oval shape, often one sided …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Prune — Prune, v. i. To dress; to prink; used humorously or in contempt. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • prune — UK US /pruːn/ verb [T] ► to reduce the number or amount of something: »The plan for the next financial year is to prune 25% off the budget …   Financial and business terms

  • Prune — Rare, le nom est surtout porté dans la Sarthe. Difficile de savoir s il évoque un marchand de prunes, un lieu où pousse le prunier, ou encore s il s agit d un sobriquet (celui qui est petit et rondouillard comme une prune). On rencontre la forme… …   Noms de famille

  • prune — Ⅰ. prune [1] ► NOUN 1) a plum preserved by drying and having a black, wrinkled appearance. 2) informal a disagreeable person. ORIGIN Greek prounon plum . Ⅱ. prune [2] ► …   English terms dictionary

  • Prune — Prune, Farbstoff, s. Gallocyanin …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • prune — index decrease, diminish, minimize, retrench Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary


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