Dicto simpliciter


Dicto simpliciter

A dicto simpliciter (Latin: "from a maxim without qualification" -- meaning 'from a universal rule') or ad Dictum simpliciter (Latin: "to a maxim without qualification" -- meaning 'to a universal rule') are Latin phrases for a type of logical fallacy. The "a" (meaning "from") is often omitted when this phrase is used in English, being mistaken for an indefinite article.

"Dicto simpliciter" fallacies are deductive logical fallacies that occur in statistical syllogisms. A dicto simpliciter occurs when an acceptable exception is ignored or eliminated. For instance, the appropriateness of using opiates is dependent on the presence of extreme pain. To justify the recreational use of opiates by referring to a cancer patient or to justify arresting said cancer patient by comparing him to the recreational user would be a dicto simpliciter.

There are exactly two kinds of a dicto simpliciter:

*Accident -- "a dicto simpliciter ad dictum secundum quid" (Where an acceptable exception is ignored.) [from general to qualified]
*Converse accident -- "a dicto secundum quid ad dictum simpliciter" (Where an acceptable exception is eliminated or simplified.) [from qualified to general]

For inductive fallacies that may affect the soundness of some statistical syllogisms, see faulty generalization.

*Card stacking often uses a dicto simpliciter.


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  • A dicto simpliciter — (Latin: from a maxim without qualification , meaning from a universal rule ) or ad dictum simpliciter (Latin: to a maxim without qualification , meaning to a universal rule ) are Latin phrases for a type of logical fallacy. A dicto simpliciter… …   Wikipedia

  • a dicto simpliciter ad dictum secundum quid — (Lat., from the statement unqualified to the statement qualified) The (alleged) fallacy of arguing from a general to a particular case, without recognizing qualifying factors: ‘If people shouldn’t park here, they shouldn’t park here to help put… …   Philosophy dictionary

  • A dicto secundum quid ad dictum simpliciter —         (лат.) логич. ошибка, состоящая в том, что средний термин силлогизма входит в одну посылку с ограничением (secundum quid), а в другую без всякого ограничения (simpliciter). Философский энциклопедический словарь. М.: Советская энциклопедия …   Философская энциклопедия

  • a dicto secundum quid ad dictum simpliciter — (Lat., from the qualified statement to the unqualified) The fallacy of taking out a needed qualification: ‘If it is always permissible to kill in war, then it is always permissible to kill.’ Also known as the converse fallacy of the accident …   Philosophy dictionary

  • A dicto secundum quid ad dictum simpliciter — From what has been said to that which has been said plainly. An error of logic in concluding the existence of collateral facts from a presumption. Hyde v United States, 225 US 347, 385, 56 1, Ed 1114, 1133, 32 S Ct 793 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • List of Latin phrases (D) — Deo Gratias redirects here. For the computer game, see List of video games by Cryo Interactive. This page lists direct English translations of Latin phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. Some of the phrases are themselves translations of …   Wikipedia

  • Fallacy — In logic and rhetoric, a fallacy is usually incorrect argumentation in reasoning resulting in a misconception or presumption. By accident or design, fallacies may exploit emotional triggers in the listener or interlocutor (appeal to emotion), or… …   Wikipedia

  • Accident (fallacy) — The logical fallacy of accident, also called destroying the exception or a dicto simpliciter ad dictum secundum quid, is a deductive fallacy occurring in statistical syllogisms (an argument based on a generalization) when an exception to the… …   Wikipedia

  • Converse accident — The logical fallacy of converse accident (also called reverse accident, destroying the exception, or a dicto secundum quid ad dictum simpliciter) is a deductive fallacy that can occur in a statistical syllogism when an exception to a… …   Wikipedia

  • Ошибки — (лог.) находятся в суждениях и умозаключениях. Ошибочным суждением наз. такое, которое не соответствует действительному объекту познания, хотя оно и почитается соответственным действительности. Если же намеренно выставляется несоответственное… …   Энциклопедический словарь Ф.А. Брокгауза и И.А. Ефрона


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