Art jewelry


Art jewelry

:"See also wearable art."Art jewelry is created with a variety of materials not just precious metals and gems. Art jewelry should be compared to expressions of art in other media such as glass, wood, plastics and clay. Art jewelry however has not yet created such a large following and is a relatively small niche, where jewelry is mostly bought by collectors and museums.

Though many consider art jewelry still part of crafts as opposed to real "Arts" (with its appropriate art critics) things are changing considerably, in particular in Germany. In the 1960s and 1970s the German Government and the commercial jewelry industry decided to foster and heavily support modern jewelry designers, and thus creating a new marketplace. They focused in particular on combined contemporary design with their goldsmithing tradition and jewelry making. At present art jewelry is no longer a niche market and many designers are sold in regular jewelry stores.

An example of current trends in art jewelry is the use of modern synthetic materials such as polypropylene, nylon and acrylic. Art jewelers have developed techniques for using these materials to dramatic effect. One example of this is award winning jeweler; Anoush Waddington, a designer working in the UK and selling internationally. Further notable makers and artists include swiss born Pierre Degen, Caroline Broadhead, Naomi Filmer, Otto Kuenzli and Florian Ladstaetter .

Fashion labels such as Bless, Martin Margiela, Comme des Garcons, etc have had a strong reference and input in the field of contemporary jewelry.

The American art jewelry scene has not gone through such a phase yet, but the number of collectors, and museums that exhibit (exclusive) art jewelry is growing constantly. The Smithsonian museum, Houston Natural History Museum, Carnegie regularly showcase pieces of contemporary (American) jewelry designers.

Some famous artists who created art jewelry in the past were Calder, Picasso, Man Ray, Meret Oppenheim, Dali and Nevelson. Some of which represented at Sculpture to Wear Gallery in New York City which closed in 1977.

Artwear Gallery owned by Robert Lee Morris continued in this endeavor to showcase jewelry as an art form.

A collection of art jewelry can be found at the Schmuckmuseum in Pforzheim Germany.

ee also

* Goldsmithing
* Silversmithing
* Fashion
* Handmade jewelry

References

One of a Kind: American Art Jewelry Today, By Susan Lewin, forewords by Barbara Rose and Jack Lenor Larsen, Harry Abrams Inc. Publishers New York, ISBN 0810931982

External links

* [http://www.metalcyberspace.com/ Metalcyberspace - a comprehensive resource site about contemporary art jewelry designers]
* [http://www.farlang.com/jewelry Art Jewelry Designer gallery] Non-Profit Foundation showing mostly high-end artists, most exhibited in the Smithsonian, GIA or other museums.
* [http://www.artjewelryforum.org/ Art Jewelry Forum] Non Profit Organization showcases new artists working with all sorts of material.


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