Christian Goldbach


Christian Goldbach
Christian Goldbach
Born March 18, 1690
Königsberg, Brandenburg-Prussia
Died November 20, 1764 (aged 74)
Moscow, Russian Empire
Nationality German
Fields Mathematics and Law
Known for Goldbach's conjecture

Christian Goldbach (March 18, 1690 – November 20, 1764) was a German mathematician who also studied law. He is remembered today for Goldbach's conjecture.

Contents

Biography

Born in the Duchy of Prussia's capital Königsberg, part of Brandenburg-Prussia, Goldbach was the son of a pastor. He studied at the Royal Albertus University. After finishing his studies he went on long educational voyages from 1710 to 1724 through Europe, visiting other German states, England, Holland, Italy, and France, meeting with many famous mathematicians, such as Gottfried Leibniz, Leonhard Euler, and Nicholas I Bernoulli. Back in Königsberg he got acquainted with Georg Bernhard Bilfinger and Jakob Hermann.

He went on to work at the newly opened St Petersburg Academy of Sciences in 1725. Later on, he was a tutor to the later Tsar Peter II in 1728. In 1742 he entered the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.[1]

He died on November 20, 1764 at age of 74, at Moscow.

Contributions

Goldbach is most noted for his correspondence with Leibniz, Euler, and Bernoulli, especially in his 1742 letter to Euler stating his Goldbach's Conjecture. He also studied and proved some theorems on perfect powers, such as the Goldbach-Euler theorem, and made several notable contributions to analysis.[1]

Works

  • (1729) De transformatione serierum
  • (1732) De terminis generalibus serierum

References

  1. ^ a b Rosen, Kenneth H. (2004). Elementary Number Theory, Fifth Edition. Addison-Wesley. ISBN 0321237072. 
  • Nicola Fragnito, A solution of Goldbach Conjecture, Journal of Algebra, Number Theory and Applications, ISSN 0972-5555, Vol. 20. Issue 2, ( March 2011 ), pages 147-211, available online at http://pphmj.com/abstract/5699.htm ttp://pphmj.com/journals/jpanta.htm

External links



Wikimedia Foundation. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Christian Goldbach — (* 18. März 1690 in Königsberg (Preußen); † 20. Novemberjul./ 1. Dezember 1764greg. in Moskau) war ein deutscher Mathematiker. Ein Brief Goldbachs an Leonhard Euler, datiert …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Christian Goldbach — (18 mars 1690 à Königsberg, Prusse 20 novembre 1764) est un mathématicien allemand. On le connait surtout pour la conjecture qui porte son nom. Sommaire 1 Biographie 2 Travaux 3 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Christian Goldbach — (18 de marzo de 1690 20 de noviembre de 1764), fue un matemático prusiano, nacido en Königsberg, Prusia (hoy Kaliningrado, Rusia), hijo de un pastor. Estudió leyes y matemáticas. Realizó varios viajes a través de Europa y conoció a varios… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Christian Goldbach — (18 de marzo, 1690 20 de noviembre, 1764), fue un matemático prusiano, nacido en Königsberg, Prusia, hijo de un pastor. Estudió leyes y matemáticas. Realizó varios viajes a través de Europa y conoció a varios famosos matemático, como Leibniz,… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Goldbach — ist der Name folgender Gemeinden: in Deutschland Goldbach (Unterfranken), Marktgemeinde im Landkreis Aschaffenburg in Bayern Goldbach (Thüringen), Gemeinde im Landkreis Gotha in Thüringen Goldbach ist der Name folgender Orte: in Deutschland:… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Goldbach's conjecture — is one of the oldest unsolved problems in number theory and in all of mathematics. It states::Every even integer greater than 2 can be written as the sum of two primes.Expressing a given even number as a sum of two primes is called a Goldbach… …   Wikipedia

  • Goldbach — may refer to:;Places *Germany: **Goldbach, Bavaria, a municipality in Bavaria **Goldbach, Thuringia, a municipality in Thuringia **Goldbach (Crailsheim), a quarter of Crailsheim in Baden Württemberg *Switzerland: **Goldbach, Hasle bei Burgdorf,… …   Wikipedia

  • Goldbach'sche Vermutung — Unter der goldbachschen Vermutung wird heute allgemein die Behauptung verstanden: Jede gerade Zahl größer als 2 kann als Summe zweier Primzahlen geschrieben werden. („binäre“ oder „starke“ goldbachsche Vermutung.) Mit dieser Vermutung haben sich… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Goldbach-Vermutung — Unter der goldbachschen Vermutung wird heute allgemein die Behauptung verstanden: Jede gerade Zahl größer als 2 kann als Summe zweier Primzahlen geschrieben werden. („binäre“ oder „starke“ goldbachsche Vermutung.) Mit dieser Vermutung haben sich… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Goldbach — El término Goldbach puede referirse a: Christian Goldbach, matemático prusiano; Conjetura de Goldbach, una de los problemas abiertos más antiguos en matemáticas. Además, es el nombre de varias ciudades y divisiones administrativas: Alemania:… …   Wikipedia Español


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.