Martín Torrijos

Martín Torrijos
President of Panama
In office
September 1, 2004 – July 1, 2009
Vice President Samuel Lewis Navarro
Rubén Arosemena
Preceded by Mireya Moscoso
Succeeded by Ricardo Martinelli
Personal details
Born July 18, 1963 (1963-07-18) (age 48)
Chitré, Panama
Political party Democratic Revolutionary Party
Spouse(s) Vivian Fernández
Occupation Economist
Religion Roman Catholic

Martín Erasto Torrijos Espino (Spanish pronunciation: [marˈtin toˈrixos]; born July 18, 1963, in Chitré, Herrera) is a Panamanian politician and the former President of the Republic of Panama.

Torrijos was elected President on May 2, 2004. As the candidate of the Democratic Revolutionary Party (PRD)– running as the Patria Nueva alliance, with the support of the smaller People's Party (PP)– Torrijos won the presidential election with about 47% of the vote, defeating three rivals. His closest challenger, former President Guillermo Endara of the Solidarity Party, conceded defeat after finishing 17 percentage points behind Torrijos.

The result had been widely expected: prior to the vote, Torrijos was well ahead of his three competitors in the opinion polls. He took office on September 1, 2004.

Contents

Biography

Martín Torrijos is the son of Omar Torrijos, who was Panama's social reformer and military strongman from 1968 to 1981. The younger Torrijos studied political science and economics at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, United States. He is a graduate of St. John's Northwestern Military Academy located in Delafield, Wisconsin. During the presidency of Ernesto Pérez Balladares (1994–1999) he served as deputy minister for the interior and justice. His most significant achievement as deputy minister was to sign into law the complete privatization of Panama's water utilities. When the new law proved unpopular the PRD effected a reversion to the previous system. During his term in office the rate of armed robberies and assault increased. There were several reported cases where SUNTRACS, a workers union, was angered, causing several riots which involved rock flinging.

Torrijos ran as the PRD's candidate in the 1999 Panamanian presidential election, finishing in second place after Mireya Moscoso of the Arnulfista Party, whose husband had been deposed by Omar Torrijos in a 1968 coup d'état. Mireya Moscoso's government ended with an approval rate of about 15%, mostly because of corruption scandals and incompetence, on which Torrijos capitalized successfully with a campaign that had three major slogans: less corruption, create more jobs and improve security.

Actions in office

Martín Torrijos and George W. Bush at the Oval Office, Friday, February 16, 2007.

His administration has focused on specific tasks, including fiscal reforms and social security reforms (now completed) and, as announced on April 27, 2006, the Panama Canal expansion project that was approved in a national referendum on October 22, 2006, in accordance with Constitution.

In November 2006, Torrijos sponsored the Latin American and Caribbean Congress in Solidarity with Puerto Rico’s Independence in favor of Puerto Rico's independence and made an energetic call to the United States to recognise the independence of Puerto Rico.[1]

In late April 2008, he met with Raúl Castro in Cuba to talk about signing an energy bill. He expressed interest in doing so.[2]

External links

References

  1. ^ Puerto Rico State Electoral Commission: Official Results for the 1998 Political-Status Plebiscite
  2. ^ "Panamanian president will sign energy agreement with Cuba". Havanna: Granma International. 2008-04-30. http://www.granma.cu/ingles/2008/abril/mier30/Panamanian.html. Retrieved 2008-04-30. [dead link]
Political offices
Preceded by
Mireya Moscoso
President of Panama
2004–2009
Succeeded by
Ricardo Martinelli

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  • Martin Torrijos — Martín Erasto Torrijos Espino (* 18. Juli 1963 in Panama Stadt) ist ein panamaischer Politiker. Er ist der Sohn des am 1. August 1981 bei einem Flugzeugabsturz gestorbenen Militärmachthabers und De facto Staatschefs Omar Torrijos. Martín Torrijos …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Martín Torrijos — (4. August 2004) Martín Erasto Torrijos Espino (* 18. Juli 1963 in Panama Stadt) ist ein panamaischer Politiker. Er ist der Sohn des am 1. August 1981 bei einem Flugzeugabsturz gestorbenen Militärmachthabers und De facto Staatschefs Omar… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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  • Martín Torrijos — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Torrijos (homonymie). Martín Torrijos Mandat …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Martín Torrijos Espino — (nacido el 18 de julio de 1963) es el presidente de Panamá desde el 1 de septiembre de 2004. Torrijos está casado y tiene tres hijos. Originario de la Ciudad de Panamá, Torrijos es hijo de Omar Torrijos Herrera, quien fuera nombrado como Jefe de… …   Enciclopedia Universal

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